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Management Of Vaccinal (Nobilis Gumboro D-78) Stress In Broiler Chicks

By: Amir Qadeer Nizami | Dr.Asim Aslam.
Contributor(s): Dr.Kamran | Dr.Shakil Akhtar Khan | Faculty of Veterinary Sciences.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: 2000Subject(s): Department of PathologyDDC classification: 0663,T Dissertation note: This project was planned to know the effects of vaccinal stress by infectious bursal disease (IBD) live virus vaccine (D-78) strain and to determine the methods by certain compounds to overcome the stress. Three hundred and thirty (330) day-old birds were reared upto 42 days. Ten birds out of 330 were slaughtered at zero day of the experiment, for estimation of maternal antibody titre. The remaining 320 birds were randomly divided into four equal groups i.e., A, B, C and D. Group A was kept as control. Group B was vaccinated but non-medicated, Group C was vaccinated and treated with vitamins for three post-vaccination days and group D was vaccinated and treated with aspirin for three post-vaccination days. Blood samples were collected on days 14th, 28th and 42nd for detection of antibody titer against IBD. Blood samples were collected from 10 randomly selected birds of each group after 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th day postvaccination. In this project following parameters were studied (i) estimation of serum biochemical substances, (ii) heterophil/ lymphocyte ratio, (iii) estimation of antibody response against IBD vaccine (iv) adrenal gland body weight index, (v) pathological studies of adrenal glands and (vi) economics of the flock. It was analyzed whether this management was an economical procedure or not by estimating the expenses, on raising the management of these stressed birds with aspirin and vitamin. It was estimated that aspirin and vitamin both check the stress to a certain extent. The birds expressed vaccination stress for variable period ranging from 1-2 days post-vaccination. In field conditions whether the flock is small or large aspirin and vitamins can be therapeutically given to control the stress and these two agents are not expensive, so they do not have any marked effect on economics of any flock.
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This project was planned to know the effects of vaccinal stress by infectious bursal disease (IBD) live virus vaccine (D-78) strain and to determine the methods by certain compounds to overcome the stress. Three hundred and thirty (330) day-old birds were reared upto 42 days. Ten birds out of 330 were slaughtered at zero day of the experiment, for estimation of maternal antibody titre. The remaining 320 birds were randomly divided into four equal groups i.e., A, B, C and D. Group A was kept as control. Group B was vaccinated but non-medicated, Group C was vaccinated and treated with vitamins for three post-vaccination days and group D was vaccinated and treated with aspirin for three post-vaccination days. Blood samples were collected on days 14th, 28th and 42nd for detection of antibody titer against IBD. Blood samples were collected from 10 randomly selected birds of each group after 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th day postvaccination. In this project following parameters were studied (i) estimation of serum biochemical substances, (ii) heterophil/ lymphocyte ratio, (iii) estimation of antibody response against IBD vaccine (iv) adrenal gland body weight index, (v) pathological studies
of adrenal glands and (vi) economics of the flock.
It was analyzed whether this management was an economical procedure or not by estimating the expenses, on raising the management of these stressed birds with aspirin and vitamin. It was estimated that aspirin and vitamin both check the stress to a certain extent. The birds expressed vaccination stress for variable period ranging from 1-2 days post-vaccination. In field conditions whether the flock is small or large aspirin and vitamins can be therapeutically given to control the stress and these two agents are not expensive, so they do not have any marked effect on economics of any flock.

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