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Prevalence Of Multiple Drug Resistant (Mdr) Bacteria In Intestinal Infections Of Dogs

By: Iffat Habib | Dr. Aftab Ahmad Anjum.
Contributor(s): Prof. Dr. Masood Rabbani.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: 2011Subject(s): Department of MicrobiologyDDC classification: 1231,T Dissertation note: Antimicrobial resistance is a complex problem involving various bacterial species, resistance mechanisms, transfer mechanisms and reservoirs. Cats and dogs are the potential sources for spread of antimicrobial resistance in humans due to their close contact with them. The horizontal transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes through plasmids, integrons and transposons has been found to play an important role in the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance genes. Canine antimicrobial resistant genes had been identified in bacteria isolated from human clinical infections suggesting the spread of resistance mechanisms from canine to human bacteria. The present study has been designed to study the prevalence of multiple drug resistant strains causing enteritis in dogs. 100 Samples were collected from different Pet clinics in and around of Lahore city. These samples were cultured for identification of MDR bacteria. Antibiotic resistance profile was studied by the standard Disk diffusion method (Kirby-Bauer Method) for commonly used antibiotics. These MDR bacteria were isolated and identified as per standard protocols described in the Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology. Different combinations of antibiotics were also evaluated for in-vitro antibiotic sensitivity for an effective treatment of these cases so that the load of MDR bacteria could be reduced. From the collected samples E. coli, Salmonella enterica, Proteus vulgaris, Citrobacter diversus and Psedomonas spp. were identified. Among all of these E.coli was most prevalent followed by Salmonella enterica, Citrobacter diversus, Proteus vulgaris and Psedomonas spp. Out of 127 E.coli isolates 52 40.94%) were declared as MDR-Bacteria following 50 Salmonella enterica isolates 17 (34.00%), 17 Citrobacter diversus 6 (35.29), 12 Proteus vulgaris isolates 06 (50%). It was concluded that MDR isolates were most sensitive to antibiotic combination (Amoxicillin + Clavulanic Acid), followed by (Oxytetracyclin + Tylosin), (Gentamycin + Ceftriaxone), and (Penicillin + Streptomycin). Out of 52 MDR E.coli isolates 23 (44.23%) were found to be invasive. Recommendations are made on prudent use of antimicrobial drugs in dogs, as well as on the need to develop science-based infection control programs in veterinary hospitals.
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Antimicrobial resistance is a complex problem involving various bacterial species, resistance mechanisms, transfer mechanisms and reservoirs. Cats and dogs are the potential sources for spread of antimicrobial resistance in humans due to their close contact with them. The horizontal transfer of antimicrobial resistance genes through plasmids, integrons and transposons has been found to play an important role in the dissemination of antimicrobial resistance genes. Canine antimicrobial resistant genes had been identified in bacteria isolated from human clinical infections suggesting the spread of resistance mechanisms from canine to human bacteria.
The present study has been designed to study the prevalence of multiple drug resistant strains causing enteritis in dogs. 100 Samples were collected from different Pet clinics in and around of Lahore city. These samples were cultured for identification of MDR bacteria. Antibiotic resistance profile was studied by the standard Disk diffusion method (Kirby-Bauer Method) for commonly used antibiotics. These MDR bacteria were isolated and identified as per standard protocols described in the Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology. Different combinations of antibiotics were also evaluated for in-vitro antibiotic sensitivity for an effective treatment of these cases so that the load of MDR bacteria could be reduced.
From the collected samples E. coli, Salmonella enterica, Proteus vulgaris, Citrobacter diversus and Psedomonas spp. were identified. Among all of these E.coli was most prevalent followed by Salmonella enterica, Citrobacter diversus, Proteus vulgaris and Psedomonas spp. Out of 127 E.coli isolates 52 40.94%) were declared as MDR-Bacteria following 50 Salmonella enterica isolates 17 (34.00%), 17 Citrobacter diversus 6 (35.29), 12 Proteus vulgaris isolates 06 (50%). It was concluded that MDR isolates were most sensitive to antibiotic combination (Amoxicillin + Clavulanic Acid), followed by (Oxytetracyclin + Tylosin), (Gentamycin + Ceftriaxone), and (Penicillin + Streptomycin). Out of 52 MDR E.coli isolates 23 (44.23%) were found to be invasive. Recommendations are made on prudent use of antimicrobial drugs in dogs, as well as on the need to develop science-based infection control programs in veterinary hospitals.

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