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Gender Differentiation From Fingerprint Ridge Count In Pakistani Population

By: Ahmed Fayyaz | Prof. Dr. Tahir Yaqub.
Contributor(s): Dr. Muhammad | Ms. Sehrish Firyal.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: 2013Subject(s): Department of Forensic ScienceDDC classification: 1668,T Dissertation note: In forensic science, fingerprinting has been used for decades as an efficient tool for identification of persons linked to an illegal activity or a crime scene. Different methods for the development and analysis of the latent fingerprints have been introduced including optical, physical and chemical methods. Each method has its own importance in the development and examination of the latent prints, which are invisible to naked eye before the application of fingerprint development methods. A lot of work has been published worldwide regarding fingerprinting. It was also reported that there is a significant difference in the ridge density of males and females. Ridge count might be helpful in the gender differentiation in Pakistani population. Patent prints of 100 males and 100 females were taken on A4 size paper or card paper using pelikan black inkpad and analysis was done with the help of 10x magnification lens. The ridges were counted diagonally within a square of 5mm x 5mm. This value depicts the number of ridges per 25 mm2. Results were analyzed by using Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). The results of this study are used as a helpful tool for forensic expert and law enforcement. It reveals that females have finer epidermal ridge detail than males. The degree of ridge density is used as presumptive indicator of gender of unknown print left at a crime scene. First we qualitatively examine if prints appear coarse or fine and then by quickly quantifying ridge density or ridge count in a manner similar to method described in this study. The outcomes of this study will be helpful in exoneration of innocents in different crimes.
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Thesis Thesis UVAS Library
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Veterinary Science 1668,T (Browse shelf) Available 1668,T
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In forensic science, fingerprinting has been used for decades as an efficient tool for identification of persons linked to an illegal activity or a crime scene. Different methods for the development and analysis of the latent fingerprints have been introduced including optical, physical and chemical methods. Each method has its own importance in the development and examination of the latent prints, which are invisible to naked eye before the application of fingerprint development methods. A lot of work has been published worldwide regarding fingerprinting. It was also reported that there is a significant difference in the ridge density of males and females. Ridge count might be helpful in the gender differentiation in Pakistani population. Patent prints of 100 males and 100 females were taken on A4 size paper or card paper using pelikan black inkpad and analysis was done with the help of 10x magnification lens. The ridges were counted diagonally within a square of 5mm x 5mm. This value depicts the number of ridges per 25 mm2. Results were analyzed by using Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). The results of this study are used as a helpful tool for forensic expert and law enforcement. It reveals that females have finer epidermal ridge detail than males. The degree of ridge density is used as presumptive indicator of gender of unknown print left at a crime scene. First we qualitatively examine if prints appear coarse or fine and then by quickly quantifying ridge density or ridge count in a manner similar to method described in this study. The outcomes of this study will be helpful in exoneration of innocents in different crimes.

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