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Industrial Drying of Foods

By: Baker, Christopher G J.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: UK: Springer; 1997Edition: 1st.Description: 309 p.ISBN: 0751403849 (hardcover); 9780751403848 (hardcover).Subject(s): Food--Drying | Drying Kinetics | Food Science and Human NutritionDDC classification: 664.0284 Baker 20145 1st 1997 Food.Science Summary: Drying is traditionally defined as that unit operation which converts a liquid, solid or semi-solid feed material into a solid product of significantly lower moisture content. In most, although not all, cases it involves the application of thermal energy, which causes water to evaporate into the vapour phase. In practice, this definition encompasses a number of technologies which differ markedly in, for example, the manner in which energy is supplied to the foodstuff and in which product is transported through the dryer. Depending on the dryer type, the residence time may vary from a few seconds to several hours. Dryers designed to handle liquid feedstocks are naturally quite different from those intended to process moist solids. Even within these two broad categories, however, many distinct varieties of dryer have evolved to meet specific process� ing needs. The dryer is frequently the last processing stage in the manufacture of a dehydrated food product. As such, it may not only bring about the desired reduction in moisture content but may also have a significant effect on a number of other properties, such as flavour, colour, texture, viability, and nutrient retention, for example. These properties, which are generally considered to affect the perceived quality of the end product, are often influenced by the temperature- moisture content-time profiles experienced by the foodstuff as it moves through the dryer. The underlying chemistry and physics are highly complex and, broadly speaking, only poorly understood.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Books Books UVAS Library
Food Sci. & Human Nutrition
Veterinary Science 664.0284 Baker 19176 1st 1997 Food.Science (Browse shelf) Available 19176
Books Books UVAS Library
Food Sci. & Human Nutrition
Veterinary Science 664.0284 Baker 19039 1st 1997 Food.Science (Browse shelf) Available 19039
Books Books UVAS Library
Food Sci. & Human Nutrition
Veterinary Science 664.0284 Baker 20145 1st 1997 Food.Science (Browse shelf) Available 20145
Total holds: 0
Browsing UVAS Library Shelves , Shelving location: Food Sci. & Human Nutrition , Collection code: Veterinary Science Close shelf browser
664.028 Sankhla 27082 1st 2011 Food.Science Food Preservation : Principles and Practice 664.028 Shafiur 19174 1st 2006 Food.Science Handbook of Food Preservation 664.028 Thapar 24347 1st 2011 Food.Science Food Composition Storage and Preservation 664.0284 Baker 19039 1st 1997 Food.Science Industrial Drying of Foods 664.0284 Baker 19176 1st 1997 Food.Science Industrial Drying of Foods 664.0284 Baker 20145 1st 1997 Food.Science Industrial Drying of Foods 664.0284 Brennan 19949 1st 1994 Food.Science Food Dehydration : A Dictionary and Guide

Drying is traditionally defined as that unit operation which converts a liquid, solid or semi-solid feed material into a solid product of significantly lower moisture content. In most, although not all, cases it involves the application of thermal energy, which causes water to evaporate into the vapour phase. In practice, this definition encompasses a number of technologies which differ markedly in, for example, the manner in which energy is supplied to the foodstuff and in which product is transported through the dryer. Depending on the dryer type, the residence time may vary from a few seconds to several hours. Dryers designed to handle liquid feedstocks are naturally quite different from those intended to process moist solids. Even within these two broad categories, however, many distinct varieties of dryer have evolved to meet specific process� ing needs. The dryer is frequently the last processing stage in the manufacture of a dehydrated food product. As such, it may not only bring about the desired reduction in moisture content but may also have a significant effect on a number of other properties, such as flavour, colour, texture, viability, and nutrient retention, for example. These properties, which are generally considered to affect the perceived quality of the end product, are often influenced by the temperature- moisture content-time profiles experienced by the foodstuff as it moves through the dryer. The underlying chemistry and physics are highly complex and, broadly speaking, only poorly understood.

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