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Prevalence Of Gastrointestinal Nematodes In Chickens Raised Under Different Poultry Production System In Muzaffar Garh Area

By: Muhammad Jamil Manzoor Daha (2012-VA-823) | Prof. Dr. Kamran Ashraf.
Contributor(s): Dr. Nisar Ahmad | Mr. Shahid Abbas.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: 2015Description: 41p.Subject(s): Department of ParasitologyDDC classification: 2346-T Dissertation note: Poultry industry is the most effective and economical source of animal protein in shortest possible time, but still it is unable to narrow down the animal protein supply and demand gap because of increasing future demands. Roundworms can cause a reduction in growth rate and damage to the intestinal mucosa, leading to blood loss and secondary infection. Heavily infected chickens may show symptoms of weight loss, droopiness, and diarrhea. Economic losses are usually associated with ascarid, Heterakis, and Capillaria, infections because of treatment cost, as well as the reduction in feed efficiency and weight gain as well as drop in egg production. Fecal samples were collected from poultry birds in different production systems , in and around district Muzaffar Garh and samples were examined by using the direct smear method, flotation technique and simple sedimentation technique. Adult worms load were examined by necropsy of dead birds fortnightly. Post mortem of dead birds during study was examined for presence of nematodes in gastro intestinal tract fortnightly from each enrolled shed in the study. The samples of adult worm found were collected for identification. During the present study four species of nematodes were identified. Ascardia galli was recovered from the small intestine, Heterakis gallinae and Subulura brumpti from the caecae . The most common gastrointestinal nematode was Ascaridia galli followed by Subulura brumpti and Heterakis gallinae. The present study has indicated that good husbandry techniques and regular deworming practices reflect markedly on the incidence and worm – burden of infected chickens
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Veterinary Science 2346-T (Browse shelf) Available 2346-T
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Poultry industry is the most effective and economical source of animal protein in shortest possible time, but still it is unable to narrow down the animal protein supply and demand gap because of increasing future demands. Roundworms can cause a reduction in growth rate and damage to the intestinal mucosa, leading to blood loss and secondary infection. Heavily infected chickens may show symptoms of weight loss, droopiness, and diarrhea. Economic losses are usually associated with ascarid, Heterakis, and Capillaria, infections because of treatment cost, as well as the reduction in feed efficiency and weight gain as well as drop in egg production.
Fecal samples were collected from poultry birds in different production systems , in and around district Muzaffar Garh and samples were examined by using the direct smear method, flotation technique and simple sedimentation technique. Adult worms load were examined by necropsy of dead birds fortnightly. Post mortem of dead birds during study was examined for presence of nematodes in gastro intestinal tract fortnightly from each enrolled shed in the study. The samples of adult worm found were collected for identification.
During the present study four species of nematodes were identified. Ascardia galli was recovered from the small intestine, Heterakis gallinae and Subulura brumpti from the caecae . The most common gastrointestinal nematode was Ascaridia galli followed by Subulura brumpti and Heterakis gallinae. The present study has indicated that good husbandry techniques and regular deworming practices reflect markedly on the incidence and worm – burden of infected chickens

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