Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Effect Of Post Pelleting Liquid Phytase Supplementation On Growth Performance And Phosphorous Utilization In Broilers

By: Muhammad Balal Munawar (2014-VA-516) | Prof. Dr. Saima.
Contributor(s): Dr. Shafqat Nawaz Qaisrani | Prof. Dr. Athar Mahmud.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: 2016Description: 49p.Subject(s): Animal NutritionDDC classification: 2631-T Dissertation note: Poultry sector is one of the most developed and vibrant segment of agriculture sector in Pakistan and is claimed to be among the largest industries of Pakistan with over more than 200 billion rupees investment and offering employment directly or indirectly to 1.5 million people. In vegetable sources used in poultry rations, P is mostly present in phytate form. Phytate P is not digested by poultry due to lack of endogenous phytase enzyme. So exogenous phytase are now added in feed to release P from phytate. Phytase is mainly derived from fungi (Aspergilus niger) and bacteria (Escherichi coli). Phytase starts work either at 3rd C (3-Phytase) or at 6thC (6-Phytase) of phytate Phytase mostly used in pre pelleting powder form but it has some activity issues during high pelleting temperature. Steam application is the most important factor that reduces enzyme activity due high steam temperature and addition of moisture ultimately lead to enzyme inactivity. Post pelleting liquid enzyme can be one solution to combat enzyme activity issue. In total, 504 1-d-old chicks were procured from a commercial hatchery and randomly assigned to six dietary treatments with Hubbard straight run n=84 chicks per treatment. Each treatment was further divided into 3 replicates with 28 birds/replicate. One treatment was served as positive control, while second was served as negative control with (0.30 and 0.26 %) P in starter and grower respectively. Other four diets had two levels (500 and 750 FTU/kg) of each powder and liquid enzyme. Liquid enzyme supplementation was done post pelleting. Pelleting temperature was kept at 85o C. Feed intake, body weight gain and FCR was recorded at the end of each week. At 35th day of experiment, 3 birds per replicate were selected randomly, weighed and slaughtered. At the time of slaughtering, blood samples were collected in heparinized tubes for the determination of plasma SUMMARY 40 P.Ileal digesta from the slaughtered birds was collected for the determination of P digestibility. The visceral organs and left tibia from the slaughtered birds were collected, organ weight was recorded and tibias were ashed for determination of Calcium and P. Data collected was analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) technique under Completely Randomized Design (CRD) and means were compared through DMR test by using SAS 9.1 version (SAS 2001). The conducted study showed 49.45%, 64.64%, and 8.64 % higher results in feed intake, body weight gain and FCR when best group H compared with group A (NC). Liver and heart weight increase in group A, however gizzard weight showed non significant (p>0.05) results among all groups. Tibia ash, Phosphorous, calcium and plasma P showed significant results (p<0.05) when all phytase supplemented diets compared with NC.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Add tag(s)
Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)

Poultry sector is one of the most developed and vibrant segment of agriculture sector in
Pakistan and is claimed to be among the largest industries of Pakistan with over more than 200
billion rupees investment and offering employment directly or indirectly to 1.5 million people. In
vegetable sources used in poultry rations, P is mostly present in phytate form. Phytate P is not
digested by poultry due to lack of endogenous phytase enzyme. So exogenous phytase are now
added in feed to release P from phytate. Phytase is mainly derived from fungi (Aspergilus niger)
and bacteria (Escherichi coli). Phytase starts work either at 3rd C (3-Phytase) or at 6thC (6-Phytase)
of phytate Phytase mostly used in pre pelleting powder form but it has some activity issues during
high pelleting temperature. Steam application is the most important factor that reduces enzyme
activity due high steam temperature and addition of moisture ultimately lead to enzyme inactivity.
Post pelleting liquid enzyme can be one solution to combat enzyme activity issue.
In total, 504 1-d-old chicks were procured from a commercial hatchery and randomly
assigned to six dietary treatments with Hubbard straight run n=84 chicks per treatment. Each
treatment was further divided into 3 replicates with 28 birds/replicate. One treatment was served
as positive control, while second was served as negative control with (0.30 and 0.26 %) P in starter
and grower respectively. Other four diets had two levels (500 and 750 FTU/kg) of each powder
and liquid enzyme. Liquid enzyme supplementation was done post pelleting. Pelleting temperature
was kept at 85o C.
Feed intake, body weight gain and FCR was recorded at the end of each week. At 35th day of
experiment, 3 birds per replicate were selected randomly, weighed and slaughtered. At the time of
slaughtering, blood samples were collected in heparinized tubes for the determination of plasma
SUMMARY
40
P.Ileal digesta from the slaughtered birds was collected for the determination of P digestibility.
The visceral organs and left tibia from the slaughtered birds were collected, organ weight was
recorded and tibias were ashed for determination of Calcium and P.
Data collected was analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) technique under
Completely Randomized Design (CRD) and means were compared through DMR test by
using SAS 9.1 version (SAS 2001).
The conducted study showed 49.45%, 64.64%, and 8.64 % higher results in feed
intake, body weight gain and FCR when best group H compared with group A (NC). Liver
and heart weight increase in group A, however gizzard weight showed non significant
(p>0.05) results among all groups. Tibia ash, Phosphorous, calcium and plasma P showed
significant results (p<0.05) when all phytase supplemented diets compared with NC.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.


Implemented and Maintained by UVAS Library.
For any Suggestions/Query Contact to library or Email:rehana.kousar@uvas.edu.pk Phone:+91 99239068
Website/OPAC best viewed in Mozilla Browser in 1366X768 Resolution.