Your search returned 60 results. Subscribe to this search

Not what you expected? Check for suggestions
|
1. Pillars of Epidemiology

by Prof. Dr. Muhammad Athar Khan.

Edition: 1st edMaterial type: book Book Publisher: Pakistan: UVAS LAHORE; 2013Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 614.4 Athar 30073 1st 2013 Epidemiology] (3).

2. Privatization Management : Trends and Prospects

by Prof. Dr. Mushtaq A. Sajid.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: Lahore: Al-Madina Publications; 1998Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 338.925 Mushtaq 22220 1st 1998 Statistics] (1).

3. Cultural Heritage of the Mughals

by Prof. Dr. Massarrat Abid | Qalb-i-Abid, S.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: Lahore: Pakistan Study Centre, PU; 2005Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 954.025 Massarrat 22358 1st 2005 History] (1).

4. Introduction to Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics / 3rd edition

by Prof. Dr. Shoaib Akhtar.

Edition: 3rdMaterial type: book Book Publisher: Faislabad: University Of Agriculture; 1999Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 636.0895 Akhtar 17378 3rd 1999 Pharmacology] (27). Checked out (1).

5. Introduction to Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics / 4th ed

by Prof. Dr. Shoaib Akhtar | Theraprutics.

Edition: 4thMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Faislabad: University Of Agriculture; 2005Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 636.0895 Akhtar 18366 4th 2005 Pharmacology] (41). Checked out (2).

6. Hand Book of Entomological Terms

by Prof. Dr. Muhammad Ashfaq | Waseem Akram Qazi.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book Publisher: Lahore: Pak Book Empire; 1998Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 595.7 Mushtaq 14440 1st 1998 Parasitology] (1).

7. Food Plant Layout and Sanitation

by Prof. Dr. Javaid Aziz Awan | Prof. Dr. Salim-ur-Rehman.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book Publisher: Pak: Unitech Communications Faislabad; 2010Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 633.1 Javaid 29720 1st 2010 Food.Science] (1), UVAS Library [Call number: 633.1 Javaid 29717 1st 2010 Food.Science] (2).

8. Modulation Of Antibiotics Resistance Pattern In Escherichia Coli By Different Plant

by Bushra Chaudary (2009-VA-232) | Dr.Muhammad Nawaz | Prof. Dr. Aftab Ahmed | Dr. Naureen Naeem.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2015Dissertation note: Escherichia coli (E. coli) is Gram negative microorganism belonging to family Enterobacteriaceae. It is part of normal micro flora of gastrointestinal tract of human and all warm blooded animals (Kaper et al. 2004). Escherichia coli is source of many infectious diseases in human as well as in animals. Common E. coli infections are enteritis, urinary tract infection, septicemia and neonatal meningitis. In pets and farm animals, E. coli is associated with diarrhea (Allocati et al. 2013). Poultry industry is facing huge annual losses due to infection of avian Pathogenic E. coli (APEC) in broilers (Oosterik et al. 2014). E. coli causes a variety of syndromes in poultry including yolk sac infection, respiratory tract infection, swollen head syndrome, septicemia and cellulitis (Buys et al. 1989) Antibiotics are chemical agents which inhibit the microbial growth and used to eradicate infections. Mechanisms of action of antibiotics provide a base to categorize antimicrobial agents. Most important classes of antibiotics act as inhibitors of cell wall synthesis, protein synthesis (tetracyclines and macrolides), nucleic acid synthesis (fluoroquinolones), metabolic pathway (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) and cell membrane (polymyxins). Bacteria may have intrinsic or acquired resistance to antimicrobials (Tenover 2006). Urinary tract infections are mostly caused by E.coli. Antibiotics generally used for the treatment of E. coli infections include ampicillin, nitrofurntion, cephalosporin, sulphonamides (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) and quonolones (neladixic acid, ofloxacine, ciprofloxacin and levofloxacine) (Lin and Lin 2010). Extended use and misuse of antibiotics lead to the development of resistant bacteria. Resistant E. coli strains are common source of hospital born and community acquired infections. Ease of Introduction 2 international travelling is one of the major spreading factor for antibiotic resistance. Resistant bacteria got opportunity to move from one geographical area to another (van der Bij and Pitout 2012). New strains of E. coli resistant to carbapenems (New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM- 1) are major global health issue (Kumarasamy et al. 2010). Antibiotic resistance has become a serious public health problem. Currently, world is facing great difficulty in treatment of many infectious disease of human and animals. One of the reasons of treatment failure is emergence of resistant bacteria (Levy 2002). To develop new strategies for treatment of infectious diseases, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms of resistance. Efflux pump inhibitors, enzymatic degradations and alteration of target sites are major strategies by which bacteria acquire or develop resistance to antibiotics (Sibanda and Okoh 2007). Scientists are looking for alternatives of antibiotics such as bacteriopheges, naturally antimicrobial compounds and some non antimicrobial agents (Worthington and Melander 2013). Probiotics (Lactobacillus and bifidobacterium) can be a prophylactic measures against E. coli and may be used to treat intestinal tract infections of E. coli and other bacteria (de Vrese and Schrezenmeir 2008). Phytochemicals, secondary metabolites of plants, have antibacterial activity against many pathogenic organisms. These phytochemicals in combination with antibiotics may show synergistic effect. Phytochemicals and plant extracts can be a source of antibiotic resistancemodifying agents (RMAs) (Abreu et al. 2012). Plant extracts shown antibacterial activity because of phytochemicals like alkaloids, tannins, flavonoids, phenolic compounds and steroids (Gobalakrishnan et al. 2013). Plant extracts are used as traditional medicine for the treatment of many diseases. Plant extracts like Zingiber officinalis (Ginger) Gymnema sylvestre (Gurmar buti), Astragalus (goat’s thorn), Calotropis procera (apple of Sodom) and oputia dillenii (cactus) have antimicrobial activity (indu et al. 2006 and Kumaar et al. 2013). Plant extracts also have antibiotic resistance modulation potential (Mako et al. 2012). Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2247-T] (1).

9. Dictionary of Helminth Parasites of Vertebrates of Pakistan

by Prof. Dr. Bilqees Fatima Mujeeb.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Karachi: Printers Karachi; 1994Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 591.524 Bilqees 14271 1st 1994 Parasitology] (2).

10. Experimental Treatment Of Bovine Brucellosis Using Phyto-Chemo-Immuno Theraputic Agents

by Muhammad Kaleem (2013-VA-860) | Prof. Dr. Aneela Zameer Durrani | Dr. Ihtisham Khan | Dr. Muhammad Hassan Saleem | Prof. Dr. Khushi Muhammad.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2015Dissertation note: Bovine brucellosis is very important zoonotic disease in respect of outbreak that resulted in reproductive loses through storm of abortions in herds and infertility in bulls. Currently, no phyto treatment for complete recovery from brucellosis is available. Phyto Chemo-immune therapeutic agents are effective for recovery from bovine brucellosis (Hypothesis) Group A was comprise five adult cows (n=5) positive for brucellosis. Animals in this group were given 3 shots of Oxytetracycline LA at 20mg/kg BW (IM) repeated every 48 hrs. Streptomycin @ 13mg/kg BW IM was given for six consecutive days. Furthermore, flunixin meglumine @ 2mg/kg BW IM for 3 days in combination with antibiotic. Selevit injection containing selenium and vitamin E was administered (IM) for consecutive five days. At next day all the animals in this group were vaccinated with a combined vaccine of RB51 and FMD (Oil based) at a dose of 3mL/animal through deep IM route. In group B, all the animals were given Saafi (Herbal Product) orally consecutively for six days. Furthermore, flunixin meglumin @ 2 mg/kg BW IM was administered for three days. All these treatments were given simultaneously. Then injection Selevit containing selenium and vitamin E were administered (IM) for consecutive five days. After treatment all animals were vaccinated with RB51 + FMD (oil based) 3mL/ animals deep intramuscularly. In group C, flunixin meglumin @ 2 mg/kg BW IM was administered for three days. After NSAID, Selevit injection containing vit. E and selenium was administered (IM) for five days regularly. After treatment, animals were vaccinated with RB51 + FMD (oil based) 3 mL/ animals (IM). In D group five negative adult animals were included in this group and vaccinated subcutaneously with RB51 and FMD (Oil based) at a dose of 3 mL/animal. Summary 40 Data regarding this study was analyzed with ANOVA and completely randomized design was used to compare the mean between different groups using statistical package for social science (SPSS) version 20. P < 0.05 was considered significant. The results showed OD values after 1st, 3rd and 6th month were significantly different in all groups. The mean values depicted that OD values was significantly higher (2.886±0.099) in vaccinated (positive) animal’s vs the other three groups. There was no significant difference in OD values of herbal treated, antibiotic treated and health control animals. The lowest OD values was found in healthy control animals, though significantly similar with herbal treated, antibiotic treated. The mean OD value at 3rd month after treatment is significantly higher (1.794±0.090) in herbal treated and vaccinated positive groups but the OD value of healthy group was lowest (1.794±0.090) after 3rd month of treatment. After 6th month of treatment the OD value of positive vaccinated group was found significantly highest (1.146±0.194). On the other hand lowest value (0.595±0.079) was found in healthy control group. All the groups have found non-significant difference in all group. Regarding Real time PCR the value range from 0-40 Ct values. In the present study the Ct values of the control positive was found to be 13 which indicate control positive. The antibiotic treated group had a Ct value found in this range 35.61 to 38.13. The herbal treated group were all positive and the values were 31.34 to 37.42 Ct. The vaccinated immune booster group. The Ct values in the group was found to be 30.83 to 34.21. The birth weight and placenta dropping time was normal in antibiotic treated animals. There were no significant results found in all groups. Summary 41 This study concluded that herbal regimen is effective in vitro against brucellosis but in vivo it is yet not to be evaluated. The antibiotics can be effective to treat the Brucellosis with this protocol. This was help to control bovine brucellosis, and extensive economic losses. Comparative efficacy of four commonly-immune therapeutic agents were help in choosing the most effective therapy/method for the recovery of bovine brucellosis. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2388-T] (1).

11. Isolation And Molecular Detection Of Salmonella Species In Milk And Milk Products

by Muhammad Umar Ijaz (2007-VA-040) | Prof. Dr. Mansur-ud-Din-Ahmad | Dr. Muhammad Hassan Mushtaq | Dr. Ali Ahmad Sheikh.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2015Dissertation note: Salmonellosis is one of the emerging zoonotic diseases. Human infections result from contaminated raw or undercooked food. Various sources of contamination in milk are dirty udder, unhygienic handling and utensils, dirty hands of milkmen and poor quality water supply at the farm. To ensure food safety there is a dire need for the availability of valid, rapid and accredited diagnostic system. Conventional culture methods for detecting Salmonella spp. in foods needs 4–5 days. The development in molecular techniques made it possible to cut short the procedure. The present study was conducted with the aim to evaluate the burden of Salmonella spp. in milk and milk products. In total 150 samples were collected, out of which there were 75 milk samples. These samples were collected from farm dairy herds (pooled milk) located in Harbanspura Dairy colony, Lahore. Salmonella was detected in 8 samples (11%) by conventional method. In addition to milk samples, 75 samples of milk products were also collected from retail shops. These include 50 samples of Yogurt and 25 samples of Yogurt milk. Milk products had 6 positive samples (8%). No sample of Yogurt was detected positive for Salmonella. The reason for this is that Yogurt had only Salmonella if it is present in starter culture. Furthermore yogurt is made after frequent heating. Salmonella is killed by such continuous and vigorous heating. Yogurt milk is prepared from Yogurt along with raw milk in a separate utensil. There are chances of contamination there so it had 6 positive samples. Total 14 (9%) samples were detected in 150 samples by conventional method. It was found that Salmonella was present in raw milk samples and milk products at places where either cleanliness was not proper, milk handling practices Summary 53 were not up to the mark, udder was not washed before milking or overall management practices were poor. Positive samples obtained by conventional method were further analyzed by PCR for Salmonella genus confirmation. Out of total 8 positive milk samples by conventional method, 5(62%) were confirmed as Salmonella genus. Similarly from 6 positive samples of milk products by conventional method, only 2(33%) were confirmed as of Salmonella genus. Further PCR was conducted for Salmonella typhimurium detection. Milk samples were containing 3(60%) positive samples while no positive sample was detected in milk products. On the basis of the results of present study, it is recommended that milk should always be boiled before use. Further Hygienic measures should be adopted during milking. Proper handling of milk and milk products is also important to limit the cross contamination. It is also advised that standards such as pasteurization and HACCP should be introduced to facilitate production of good quality milk. Electronic and print media should also create awareness among people about food safety. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2408-T] (1).

12. Sawan e Hayaat: Quaid e Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah

by Prof. Dr. M. A Sufi.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Lahore: Book Home; 2014Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 915.40350924 Sufi 30964 1st 2014 Biography] (2).

13. Jālianvālah Bāgh Kā Qatl-e Aam aur Maẓālim Panjāb

by Prof. Dr. Ghulam Hussain Zulfiqar.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Lahore: Sang e Meel Publications; 1996Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 954.0357 Ghulam 21020 1st 1996 History] (1).

14. Surgical Ward (Novel)

by Prof. Dr. M. Imtiaz Rasool.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Lahore: Minhaaj-Ul-Quraan; 2007Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 891.432 Imtiaz 22349 1st 2007 Urdu.Novel] (1).

15. Isolation And Molecular Characterization Of Causative Agent Of Equine Strangles

by Tayyaba Naz (2008-VA-235) | Prof. Dr. Khushi Muhammad | Dr. Aamir Ghafoor | Prof. Dr. Aneela Zamir Durrani.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2015Dissertation note: Strangles is an important infectious and contagious disease of horses that affects upper respiratory tract. This disease is very much prevalent in Pakistan. Disease can be controlled by early diagnosis, strict quarantine measures and proper immunization. Disease is characterized by nasal discharge, submandibular lymph node swelling, raised temperature and anorexia. The disease can terminate into encephalitis, purpura hemorrhagica and bastard strangles. 20 nasal swabs as samples were collected from horses showing signs of nasal discharge or swollen lymph nodes from Remount depot Sargodha, 10 samples from clinically sick horses and 10 from apparently healthy horses with the history of disease. Samples were swabbed on to blood agar with 5% defibrinated blood of sheep. Isolated hemolytic colonies were undergone biochemical testing with the help of API strep 20 kit. Samples which appeared as streptococcus equi through biochemical testing were subjected to molecular amplification by targeting two genes. Two different PCR were performed PCR 1 targeted the Sod A gene this gene is present in Streptococcus equi and PCR-2 targetted SeM gene this gene is specific for Streptococcus equi subsp. Equi only. 5 samples were confirmed positive for Streptococcus equi through biochemical and molecular testing. SDSPAGE on the isolated bacterial samples were performed and it appeared as no protein diversity was observed among different isolates. However the protein pattern varied with number of passages as less number of bands appeared from older cultures. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2445-T] (1).

16. Prevalence Of Fasciolosis In Sheep And Goats Under Range Management Conditions In Azad Jammu And Kashmir

by Imtiaz Ahmad (2009-VA-535) | Prof. Dr. Aneela Zameer Durrani | Prof. Dr. Muhammad S. Anjum | Prof. Dr. Kamran Ashraf.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2015Dissertation note: Fasciolosis is the disease of sheep, goats, cattle and other ruminants. Human and equines are unusual hosts in which instead of liver the flukes may found in lungs or under the skin. Transmission depends on an intermediate host lymnae snail. Animal ingest metacercaria, the worm migrates to the liver where it causes extensive damage and mature worm lives in bile duct. The disease occurs as an acute, sub-acute or chronic infection. Chronic Fasciolosis characterized by anemia, hypoalbuminaemia, emaciation, submandibular edema and loss of condition. Clinical disease is well known but sub clinical infections are often unnoticed, leading to marked economic losses, reduced milk yield, weight loss, reduced fertility and immunity, consequently leading to significant economic losses. Fasciolosis has recently been recognized as an emerging zoonotic disease. Infections in human may be asymptomatic but sometimes nonspecific pain in abdomen, anorexia, dyspepsia and vomiting may occur. Pain in right hypochondrium, epigastrium and jaundice occurs in chronic phase. Sometimes ectopic migration of worm causes abscesses in many organs. The present study investigates the prevalence of Fasciolosis in sheep and goats at different geographic locations on the basis of altitudes in Azad Jammu and Kashmir. 4662 (sheep n=2242; goat n=2420) fresh fecal samples from sheep and goats were collected from three village/towns each of Mirpur, Poonch and Muzaffarabad Divisions. Stool samples were collected from 566 pastoral families of AJK to determine the zoonotic potential of the disease. Prevalence of the disease was calculated on the basis of centrifugal floatation and sedimentation techniques. The intensity of infection was calculated using the McMaster egg counting technique. The risk factors of the disease studied included altitude, season, sex, age, and effect of deworming and flock size on the rate of prevalence. An overall prevalence was recorded as Summary 111 17.88%. Prevalence of Fasciolosis in sheep revealed 26.49% and that of goats 9.91%. The data was analyzed using Chi-square test which revealed a significant difference (P<0.05) in the prevalence of the disease in sheep and goats. The overall prevalence rate in both species was recorded as15.09% at altitude <3000 feet, 25.00% at 3000-6000 and 15.74% at >6000. The highest prevalence was recorded at an altitude 3000-6000 feet. Chi- square values showed significant difference (P<0.05) among three different altitudes. The altitude of 3000-6000ft showed a significantly higher (P<0.05) prevalence of Fasciolosis in sheep and goats. The overall prevalence showed 13.93% rates in spring and 21.77% in autumn. Chi-square values showed a significant difference (P<0.05) in the prevalence of the disease, higher in autumn than Spring. Sex wise prevalence showed 16.67% in male and 18.59% in female animals. The data showed no significant difference (P>0.05) in Chi-square analysis. The prevalence of the disease in the age group below 1 year was 04.40%, 1-4 years revealed 17.73% disease and 36.18% in >4 year. The data showed significantly different (P<0.05) rates in all age groups. Highest prevalence was recorded in sheep and goats above 4 year of age and lowest in those below 1 year. The prevalence in animals with no recent history of deworming was recorded 23.22%. The data showed 15.37% disease in small flocks of sheep and goats <30 as compared to 18.72% in large flocks >30. Chi-square showed a significantly higher (P<0.05) prevalence of the disease in large flocks. Generalized Linear Model (GLM) was used to evaluate the contribution of risk factors (epidemiological factors) to the variations in the prevalence of Fasciolosis in sheep and goats. All the epidemiological factors i.e. altitude, species, season, gender, age group, deworming and flock size were processed. The deworming appeared to be the most significant factor in the model contributing maximum variations in disease with highest Odds followed by age groups, Summary 112 species, season, altitude, flock size and gender. The risk factors for the Fasciolosis in sheep and goats were found, lack of practice of deworming, age group >4 year, species sheep, season Autumn, altitude 3000-6000 and flock size >30. The 75% of the disease prevalence was due to above mentioned risk factors. The deworming, specie goat, age group <1 year, season Spring, altitude <3000, and flock size less than 30 were appeared to be the protective factors in the Generalized Linear Model. The intensity of infection was analyzed through Factorial analysis for difference in species, altitude and season. The difference in eggs per gram of feces was found significantly different (P<0.05) in sheep and goats. The effect of season on egg per gram (EPG) of feces showed a higher mean values in sheep (191.49) and goats (219.72) in Autumn as compared to 158.04 and 180.61 in Spring. In both seasons the mean for goats was found higher than sheep. The effect was found significant (P<0.05), higher during Autumn. Factorial analysis of the data showed significant interaction (P<0.05) between species and altitude. The data showed mean values for sheep 174.04, 191.87 and 168.33 at altitude <3000, 3000-6000 and >6000 feet respectively. The mean values for goats were 232.22, 194.95 and 170.59. The data revealed higher mean for goats as compared to sheep on all three altitudes. Goats revealed significantly higher (P<0.05) number of EPG. POST HOC Tukeys test showed a non-significant difference in intensity of disease between <3000 and 3000-6000 feet, rest of the differences were significant (P<0.05). The overall prevalence in pastoral communities of AJK was 0.88%. The samples were collected from male and female of 4 age groups <10 year, 11-20, 21-40 and >40. The prevalence in male was 0.76 and in female was 0.98%. The data showed that age groups below 20 year were Summary 113 the susceptible groups in both sexes. The highest prevalence (2.25%) was found in female age group 11-20 year. Age groups above 20 year did not revealed any positive sample. 227 adult liver flukes were collected from livers of infected animals of different animal species (sheep, goats. cattle and buffaloes) and geographic locations for morphometric and molecular identification of the species of Fasciola. Flukes were identified on the basis of measurements of body length, body width, diameter of suckers, distance between oral and ventral sucker and distance between ventral sucker and posterior end of the body. The measurements of F. hepatica showed a body length range 13-34mm with an average length of 21.51mm whereas, F. gigantica ranged from 28-52mm with an average of 42.27mm. The average body lengths of F. hepatica below 3000ft was 21.9, at 3000-6000ft was 21.07 and above 6000 ft was 22.00mm and that of F. gigantica was 42.05 and 42.44mm at 3000 and 3000-6000 feet. The measurements of F. hepatica revealed an average body width of 10.05mm, average diameter of oral and ventral suckers of 0.74 and 1.28mm respectively and average distance between the two suckers of 1.34mm. The readings for F. gigantica were 9.46, 0.89, 1.55 and 1.72mm respectively. Average distance between ventral sucker and posterior end of the fluke in case of F. hepatica was 18.35mm at all three altitudes and host species of animals and it was 38.26mm in case of F. gigantica. The overall mean worm load was 13.56 worms per liver of animal with a range 5-26. The mean worm load of F. hepatica was 10.9 and that of F. gigantica 13.11. Mixed infections were noted at altitudes below 6000 ft. Infestation with F. gigantica was not found at altitudes above 6000ft and F. hepatica was encountered at all three altitudes. 51.98% of the recovered flukes were F. gigantica which showed the equal chances of infection with either species of Fasciola in AJK. The results revealed that F. hepatica was the fluke affecting animal population at altitude above 6000 ft and F. gigantica was the major fluke below Summary 114 3000 ft. At altitudes between 3000-6000ft, 36.20% of flukes were F. hepatica while its prevalence was reduced to 17.30% below 3000 ft. Once the species of the liver flukes were identified morphologically they were subjected to molecular conformation through amplification of the genomic DNA of the two species through PCR using two sets of species specific primers. In the PCR based on primer set 1, a product of 391 bp was generated from the genomic DNA of Fasciola hepatica whereas no product was generated from the DNA of Fasciola gigantica. PCR based on primer set 2 amplified a 235-bp product from the DNA of Fasciola gigantica. The molecular identification in the present study showed that morphometric identification of the two species is valid and standard population of both species were found present at different geographic locations and species of the animals of the state of Azad Jammu and Kashmir except F. gigantica not found above 6000 feet altitude. The ethno veterinary practices for Fasciolosis were documented through Participatory Rural Appraisal. A total of 173 respondents/key informants were interviewed during the study period in the study area. The majority of the traditional healers (n=33) elders of pastoral families (n=53) and sheep/goats owners (n=56) were above the age of 40 year. Veterinary officers (n=6) and assistants (n=25) were interviewed as a part of verification process. 31.69% of the respondents were found using allopathic anthelmintic along with ethno veterinary medicines. 53.52% of the respondents were using ethno veterinary medicines because of non-availability or cost effectiveness of allopathic anthelmintic. 95.18% of the respondents were using plants or part of the plant as traditional anthelmintic in their sheep or goats.18 plant families were identified during the survey which include Acanthaceae, Asclepiadaceae, Asteraceae, Berberidaceae, Boraginaceae, Cannabinaceae, Chenopodaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae, Summary 115 Gentianaceae, Juglandaceae, Liliaceae, Malvaceae, Oxalidaceae, Punicaceae, Rhamnaceae, Scrophulariaceae, Solanaceae. The species of medicinal plants identified during the study were Berberis lyceum, Nicotiana tabacum, Asparagus officinale, Calotropis procera, Aloe vera, Mallotus philippensis, Adhato davesica, Artemisia scoparia, Xanthium strumarium, Chenopodium ambrosoides, Artimisia maritime, Verbascum Thapsus, Acacia Arabica, Cordlia myxa, Cannabis sativa, Rhamnus purpurea, Juglansregia, Oxalis corniculata, Punica granantum, Artimisa fragrans, Swertia petiolata and Abutilon indicum. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2430-T] (1).

17. Detection of Albendazole Resistance in Commonly Found Gastrointestinal Tract Nematodes of Sheep

by Muhammad Naeem (2007-VA-168) | Dr. Syed Saleem Ahmad | Dr. Muhammad Avais | Prof. Dr. Azhar Maqbool.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2015Dissertation note: CD Corrupted. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2491-T] (1).

18. Dawat Din Kisay Dain ?

by Prof. Dr. fazal Ellahi.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Daral Noor; 2015Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297 FAzal 31584 2015 Islam] (1).

19. Hajj Wa Umra Ki Asanian

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Ellahi.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Lahore; Darul Noor; 2014Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297 Ellahi 31588 1st 2014 Islam] (1).

20. Assessment Of Avian And Mammalian Diversity At Selected Sites Along River Chenab

by Muhammad Altaf (2008-VA-725) | Dr. Arshad Javid | Dr. Waseem Ahmad Khan | Prof. Dr. Muhammad Ashraf.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2016Dissertation note: The River Chenab is an important wetland of Punjab province and the tree plantations around the river are the part of tropical thorn forest. But as a consequence of deforestation much of the natural forested areas have been turned to agricultural land. The main objective of study was to assess the avian and mammalian diversity of the study area; to identify and assess anthropogenic impacts on avian and mammalian diversity of the study area; and to explore the level of humanwildlife conflict selected sites of river Chenab i.e. district Sialkot, district Gujrat and district Gujranwala from May, 2013 through April. Surveys were made during dawn (5:00 am to 8:00 am) and dusk (4:00 pm to 7:00 pm). During the waterfowl study recorded 51 species belonging to 33 genera, 16 families and 8 orders were recorded from the study area. Throughout the year a total of 2531 birds from recorded from head Marala, 2026 from the head Khanki and 2230 from head Qadirabad. Diversity indices were analyzed through statistical software PAST version 2.17 C. The Shannon-Weiner diversity index at head Marala was 2.62, at head Khanki it was 2.64 while at head Qadirabad it was 2.78. It can be concluded from the present study that the River Chenab is waterfowl rich and should be declared as protected site for waterfowls. The study area was divided into different habitat types on the basis of vegetation and urbanization and was designated as forest habitat (FH), wetland habitat (WLH), rural forest habitat (RFH), agriculture habitat (AH), agriculture rural habitat (ARH), urban non vegetative habitat (UNVH) and urban vegetative habitat (UVH). A linear count method was applied and data was collected through direct and indirect observations. Habitat preference of the birds varied f declined from forested habitats to the urban landscapes. It can be concluded from the study that Summary 152 many of the avian species are habitat specific and the connection/corridors between similar habitat types might be fruitful for the conservation of avian species. The anthropogenic impacts and habitat preferences of mammalian species along river Chenab, Pakistan was also assessed the mammalian diversity was recorded along forested landscapes, cultivated plantations, semi-urban and urban areas. The data on diversity and distribution of various mammalian species was collected through point count method viz. direct observation (personal count and record voices) and indirect observation (presences of carcasses, fecal pellet, pug marks and meeting with local communities). The habitat preferences of large, medium and small mammals varied significantly. A decline in mammalian diversity was observed from forest habitat to urban landscapes. Indian wild boar, Asiatic jackal, Indian fox, jungle cat, Indian pangolin and long eared desert hedgehog preferred forested areas as well as slightly modified habitats while Northern palm squirrel, house mouse, house shrew and rat species preferred human habitations. Similarly, few species such as the small Indian mongoose, Soft-furred field rat, short tailed mole rat, Asiatic jackal and Indian gerbil preferred cultivated areas. It can be concluded that many of the mammalian species are habitat specific and corridors and connections between different landscapes are important for the conservation of mammalian diversity. Medicinal and cultural significance of avian species along the River Chenab were assessed through Relative Popularity Level (RPL) and Rank Order Priority (ROP). One hundred and nine persons were interviewed and data regarding socio-economic status of the respondents, qualitative data on cultural significance from three selected districts. The compiled data are analyzed using different quantitative tools, such as relative frequency of mention (RFM), fidelity level (FL), relative popularity level RPL and rank order priority (ROP). Out of total 155 Summary 153 avian species recorded from the study area, 28 have medical importance while local people were using feathers of almost all the bird species for making different toys. Ten species were most popular and highest RFM values (0.58) were recorded for house sparrow (Passer domesticus). Similarly, highest FL values (100%) were recorded for house sparrow (P. domesticus) and domestic chicken (Gallus gallus). These studies indicated that the area is rich in avian diversity and many of these species have medical and cultural significance for the locales. Mammals are source of food and medication for humans from ancient times. A survey was conducted along the Rver Chenab, Punjab, Pakistan and 109 persons were interviewed to investigate the extent of human dependency on mammalian species of the area. A total of 30 mammalian species were recorded from the study area. Highest relatively frequency of mention (RFM) values (0.5) were observed for desert hare, Lepus migricollis dayanus while maximum (100%) fidelity level (FL) was recorded for cow Bos gaurus, sheep Ovis aries and cat Felis domesticus. Seven species were most popular. It can be concluded from present survey that local people have strong association with mammalian species of the study area and dependent for food and medicines on these species. In depth studies are recommended to explore medicinal importance of the species. The study area was part of tropical thorn forest but a larger portion has been changed into agricultural land or human habitations. Data regarding socio-economic value of area, financial losses to crops and livestock, peoples’ attitude and tolerance towards wildlife, protection methods for livestock and crops from predators and profile of 150 respondents were collected through a questionnaire. The age of the respondents was between 20 to 65 years, out of them 54% were literate, 99% were Muslims and all these respondents were from different professions viz. farmers (32%), livestock managers (37%) and others (31%). Most of the respondents (52%) Summary 154 were unaware about the role of wild species in ecosystem, certain respondents (28%) disliked wild species in their areas and 20% respondents had positive view about wildlife in the area. The collected data revealed that crops are mostly damaged by the Indian wild boar (42%), Asiatic jackal (34%), diseases (11%), Indian crested porcupine (6%) and others (7%) including rats, squirrels, crows and sparrows. Similarly, the livestock animals are affected mostly by diseases (36%), Asiatic jackal (34%), jungle cat (10%), Indian fox and others (6%) including raptor birds. Most of the respondents were of the view that wildlife is declining in the area. The River Chenab is an important wetland of Punjab, Pakistan. Water of the river is becoming pollutedt due to anthropogenic impact i.e. industrial waste, urbanization, agriculture intensification. The main objectives of the study were to know the diversity and distribution of fish species of river Chenab. Both, direct and indirect methods were applied to find out fish diversity of the area. The diversity indices were analyzed through statistical software PAST version 2.17 C. During the sampling 34 species was recorded from the river Chenab. The diversity indices indicate that higher diversity is present at the head Qadirabad than head Khanki and Marala. The reason is that there is present large number of natural and manmade ponds; during the flood these pond fishes move to the river further eggs and fingerlings move to rivers through birds and fisherman. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2520-T] (1).

21. Comparative Efficacy of Steroids and Non Steroids Anti-Inflammatory Drugs On Wound Healing In Equines

by Sajid Ali (2009-VA-129) | Prof. Dr. Muhammad Arif Khan | Dr. Hamid Akbar | Dr. Muhammad Hassan Saleem.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2016Dissertation note: Blank CD. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2502-T] (1).

22. Beti Ki Shan-o-Azmat

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Ilahi.

Edition: 1st edMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Dar-un-Noor Publications; 2015Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.5 Fazal 31580 1st 2015 Islam] (1).

23. Azkar-e-Nafiya

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Ilahi.

Edition: 1st edMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Dar-un-Noor Publications; 2016Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.1222 Fazal 31579 1st 2016 Islam] (1).

24. Kitaab ul Zawaaj: Khandani Nizam

by Syed Muhammad Sabiq | Prof. Dr. Abdul Kabeer Muhsin.

Edition: 1st ed. Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Lahore: Maktaba Islamia; 2015Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.5 Sabiq 31570 1st 2015 Islam] (1).

25. Hazrat Ibrahim Ki Qurbani Ka Qissa

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Ilahi.

Edition: 1st edMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Dar-un-Noor Publications; 2013Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.1222 Fazal 31590 1st 2013 Islam] (1).

26. Rizq Aur Us Ki Duayein

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Ilahi.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Dar-un-Noor Publications; 2015Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.1222 Fazal 31601 1st 2015 Islam] (1).

27. Walidain Ka Ihtisab

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Ilahi.

Edition: 1st edMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Dar-un-Noor Publications; 2013Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.5 Fazal 31603 1st 2013 Islam] (1).

28. Taqwa: Ahmiyat, Barkat, Isbab

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Ilahi.

Edition: 1st edMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Dar-un-Noor Publications ; 2014Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.5 Fazal 31602 1st 2014 Islam] (1).

29. Zana Ki Sangini Aur Us Kay Buray Asrat

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Ilahi.

Edition: 1st edMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Dar-un-Noor Publications; 2015Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.5 Fazal 31604 1st 2015 Islam] (1).

30. Namaz-e-Bajimat Ki Ahmiyat

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Ilahi.

Edition: 1st edMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Dar-un-Noor Publications; 2015Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.3 Fazal 31599 1st 2015 Islam] (1).

31. Nabi Kareem Ki Mohabbat Kay Asbab

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Ilahi.

Edition: 1st edMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Dar-un-Noor Publications; 2016Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.63 Fazal 31598 1st 2016 Islam] (1).

32. Fazail-e-Dawat

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Ilahi.

Edition: 1st edMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Dar-un-Noor Publications; 2014Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.7 Fazal 31587 1st 2014 Islam] (1).

33. Dawat-e-Din: Kis Cheez Ki Taraf Di Jaye?

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Ilahi.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Dar-un-Noor Publications; 2013Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.7 Fazal 31583 1st 2013 Islam] (1).

34. Dawat-e-Din: Kahan Di Jaye?

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Ilahi.

Edition: 1st edMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Dar-un-Noor Publications; 2013Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.7 Fazal 31582 1st 2013 Islam] (1).

35. Musibaton Say Kesay Nimtein

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Ilahi.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Dar-ur-Noor Publications; 2016Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.77 Fazal 31595 1st 2016 Islam] (1).

36. Dawat-e-Din: Kis Waqt Di Jaye?

by Prof. Dr. Fazat Ilahi.

Edition: 1st edMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Dar-un-Noor Publications; 2016Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.7 Fazal 31586 1st 2016 Islam] (1).

37. Nabi Kareem Bahesiyat-e-Walid

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Ilahi.

Edition: 1st edMaterial type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Dar-un-Noor Publications; Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.63 Fazal 31596 1st Islam] (1).

38. Qarz Kay Fazail-o-Masail

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Ilahi.

Edition: 1st edMaterial type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Dar-un-Noor Publications; Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.77 Fazal 31600 1st Islam] (1).

39. Qarz Kay Fazail-o-Masail

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Ilahi.

Edition: 1st edMaterial type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Dar-un-Noor Publications; Availability: No items available

40. Nabi Kareem Say Mohabbat Aur Us Ki Alamatein

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Ilahi.

Edition: 1st edMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Dar-un-Noor Publications; 2016Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.63 Fazal 31597 1st 2016 Islam] (1).

41. Bachon Ka Ihtisab

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Ilahi.

Edition: 1st edMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Dar-un-Noor Publications; 2014Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.77 Fazal 31581 1st 2014 Islam] (1).

42. Dawat-e-Dean kasay dain

by Prof Dr. Fazal Elahi.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Daral Noor; 2015Availability: No items available

43. Fiqa al Sunnah

by Prof. Dr. Abdul Kabeer Mohsin(Translator) | Syed Sabiq.

Edition: 1st,V.2Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Lahore: Maktaba-e-Islamia; 2015Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.12 Mohsin 31566 1st,V.1 2015 Islam] (2).

44. Haqiqat-e-Jihad

by Prof. Dr. Tahir ul Qadri.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Lahore: Minhaj ul Quran; 2005Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.72 Qadri 21778 1st 2005 Islam] (1).

45. China ka Chillah

by Prof. Dr. M. Abdullah.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Lahore: Maktaba-e- Alia; 2009Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 910 Abdullah 23506 1st 2009 Urdu.Literature] (1).

46. Madr e Millat Mohtarma Fatima Jinnah

by Prof. Dr. M.A Sufi.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Lahore: Ilmo Irfan Publishers; 2003Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 923.29549 Sufi 22245 1st 2003 Biography] (1).

47. Aurat Quran o Sunnat Aur Tareekh Kay Aainay Main

by Prof. Dr. Abida Ali.

Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Lahore: Quran Manzil; not specifiedAvailability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.082 Abida 18101 1st Islam] (4).

48. Quran e Hakeem kay moujazat

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Kareem.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Lahore: Feroz Sons; 2005Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.1 Fazal 21399 1st 2005 Islam] (1).

49. Fazail e Dawat

by Prof. Dr. Fazal Elahi.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Islamabad: Daral Noor; 2014Availability: No items available

50. Salook o Tasawuf Ka Amli Dastoor

by Prof. Dr. Tahir ul Qadri.

Edition: 9th ed. Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Lahore: Minhaj ul Quran Publications; 2005Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 297.4 Tahir 21752 9th 2005 Sufism] (1).



Implemented and Maintained by UVAS Library.
For any Suggestions/Query Contact to library or Email:rehana.kousar@uvas.edu.pk Phone:+91 99239068
Website/OPAC best viewed in Mozilla Browser in 1366X768 Resolution.