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51. Principles of Cattle Production

by Phillips, C. J. C | Cattle--Productivity.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: UK: CABI International; 2001Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 636.21 Phillips 18094 1st 2001 Livestock] (1).

52. Dairy Microbiology

by Parihar, Pradeep.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: India: AGROBIOS; 2006Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637 Parihar 18969 1st 2006 Dairy] (4).

53. Milk And Milk Products

by Winton,Andrew L | Dairy products.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: India: Agrobios; 2006Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637 Winton 50250 1st 2014 Dairy] (5), UVAS Library [Call number: 637 Winton 20619 1st 2006 Dairy] (1).

54. Development And Evaluation Of Mozzarella Cheese Influenced By Type Of Starter Culture And Fat Content Of Milk

by Imran Taj Khan (2013-VA-866) | Mr. Muhammad Junaid | Dr. Muhammad Ayaz | Mr. Muhammad Saadullah.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2015Dissertation note: Pakistan is the 4th largest milk producing country in the world having 50.99 million tons/year in which buffalo and cow add 61% and 35% share, respectively to total milk production in Pakistan, while the rest 5% of the total milk is contributed by other species like small ruminants and camel. Out of the total produced milk only 7-8% of the milk is processed and passes via milk supply chain while the remaining is distributed as raw milk (GOP, 2013-14). Processing of milk into cheese is a small segment in Pakistan, moreover the eating habits are not developed in Pakistani population along with the increase in price of local as well as imported cheese. The manufacturing of cheese is one of the best examples of preserving milk, dating back from 6000-7000 BC till now. Cheese like other value added dairy products are among the highly nutritious diet of the world. Cheese comes in great variety of tastes and flavors, in a wide array of shapes, and are highly healthful and nutrimental (Walstra et al. 2006). The utilization of cheese in the form of pizza garnishes, cheese mixes, salads, sandwiches, stuffing has expanded because of dietary resemblance, ease and extensibility being used and cheese quality (Fox et al. 2000). Cheese manufacturing is increasing worldwide at the rate of 4.9% every year (Valhovic et al. 2014). Cheese is the value added dairy product acquired by the seepage (of fluid) after coagulation of milk proteins through utilization of rennet and starter. Cheese is a mainstream nourishment because of its differing qualities in application, wholesome quality, accommodation and appealing taste. The assorted qualities are because of an expanding information of the innovation of cheese making and the natural chemistry and microbiology of cheese maturing (Sulieman et al. 2013). There are 500–800 assortments of cheese accessible in the universal business sector (Razzaq, 2003). Mozzarella cheese is placed in the group of “Pasta filata” or stretched cheeses. Stretching is a treatment that gives the curd elasticity which is a dominating functional characteristic of Mozzarella cheese. Melting and stretching are the most important characteristics of Mozzarella cheese which is highly acknowledged in the making of Pizza as it is a chief ingredient (Owni et al. 2009). Mozzarella cheese is a standout amongst the most prominent cheese varieties on the planet, in light of its essential use in the pizza topping (Kindstedt et al., 2004). The funtional attributes of Mozzarella cheese like shape, composition, meltability, stretchbility and color are changed by the components like milk composition, culture source or type and maturing environment dominating in the midst of the cheese availability (Luecy et al. 2003). Mozzarella cheese is produced utilizing a paired lactic acid bacteria starter cultures of Streptococcus salvarius ssp. thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp.bulgaricus (Ahmed et al. 2011). At a certain point, Mozzarella was made just from water buffalo milk. Presently, it is normally produced using milk of bovine, goat and sheep. There are two types of Mozzarella cheese; i.e. regular Mozzarella which is accessible in low-fat and nonfat structures and has a semi-delicate in texture, versatile composition and is drier than fresh Mozzarella while, Fresh Mozzarella is produced using entire drain and has a gentler texture and sweet pleasing flavor and is commonly pressed in water or whey (Ibrahim, 2003). Mozzarella cheese also has numerous therapeutical advantages; it is a decent wellspring of protein, vitamins and minerals. Utilization of Mozzarella cheese may secure against gout, an agonizing condition that outcomes in the development of uric acid stones in the joints. The calcium found in Mozzarella cheese additionally has its commitment in body weight reduction and gives insurance against breast tumor and metabolic disorder, which is a gathering of conditions that build the danger of creating cardiovascular disease or stroke (Ibrahim, 2003). Low fat Mozzarella cheese is a nice wellspring of protein and calcium, furthermore it is non calorie-dense and less in saturated fat, which can prevent from cardiovascular illness, type 2 diabetes, joint inflammation, and memory loss, also block weight reduction endeavors upon consumption. Eating low fat ("part-skim") or fat-free Mozzarella cheese is an extraordinary approach to gain by its alimental advantages while minimizing unfortunate additional items. The calcium in Mozzarella cheese aides keep up healthy pulse rate and blood pressure (Bauer, 2014). Mozzarella cheese production in the country in demand based being its most use in the pizza sector while its limited use as fresh product. Moreover the industry is using commercial imported culture for production of this cheese. The high price of the culture is one of the factor in the high price of the final product. Therefore the present study was designed with an objective to utilize the local culture for production of Mozzarella cheese. The idea was to maintain the quality of product at its higher regime. Furthermore its quality attributes were compared with the standard cheese produced from commercial culture. In addition the effect of change in fat level of milk on the quality and overall acceptability of the produced Mozzarella cheese was assessed. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2266-T] (1).

55. Antimicrobial Potential Of Bovine Lactoferrin Against Foodborne Pathogens

by Ammarah Khatoon (2012-VA-631) | Prof. Dr. Muhammad Ayaz | Mr. Ishtiaque Ahmed | Prof. Dr. Aftab Ahmed Anjum.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2014Dissertation note: Health is recourse of everyday life, but not the object to live. It is positive to give special importance to personal and social resources. However, in Pakistan and other developing countries conditions are different, most people have low income and they live in un-sanitized environment. They eat un-hygienic food and also lack safe drinking water. People do not adopt any preventive measure to minimize the risk of contamination. Food storage is also un-hygienic. These conditions lead towards contamination and result in foodborne infections and gastro-enteritis. Foodborne illnesses are always a serious health issue in the Pakistan and throughout the world. Individual’s record for foodborne illnesses is impossible but it is reported that 7 out of 10 people suffer from foodborne illness caused by different microbes each year worldwide (WHO survey 2012). Foodborne illness is caused by eating contaminated food with pathogenic bacteria. Some common pathogens are Escherichia coli, Campylobacter jejuni, Clostridium botulinum, Clostridium perfringens, Listeria monocytogens, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonellaspecies. Incubation period for onset of symptoms of food poisoning ranges from hours to days. Nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, fever and diarrhea are symptoms which appear commonly in most of food poisoning. However, foodborne illnesses if left untreated can lead severe dehydration, imbalance of intestinal micro flora, digestive disorders and even death in some cases. It was recorded that 2.2 million people killed from foodborne illness globally every year and the burden arising from foodborne diseases is larger (Kuchenmuller et al. 2009). Antibioticsare massively used to overcome food poisoning; however, from health point of view they badly affect thenormal micro flora of gut but also microbes become antibiotic resistance. The problem needs to be dealt with some other way like adding bio preservatives or antimicrobial agents in food. To control microbes in foods, numerous methods have been adopted including the use of synthetic and natural antimicrobial agents. Scope of natural antimicrobial agents are increasing day by day and different natural sources are being utilized to get these agents. Among these natural sources milk is best and widely utilized source from long times. Milk contains many biologically active compounds among which lactoferrin is one of them. Lactoferrin is a multifunctional globular glycoprotein from transferrin family, an iron-binding protein. It is part of innate immune system and has antibacterial activity known as far back as 1930. It was first isolated in 1939 from cow milk (Charrondiere et al. 2011). Lactoferrin belongs to the transferrin family having ability to bind iron two times higher than other transferrin proteins. Its molecular weight is 80 kDa and has about 700 amino acids depending upon species e.g. cow, buffalo, goat and sheep (Adlerova et al. 2008). Lactoferrin molecule consists of simple polypeptide chain folded into two symmetrical and highly homologous lobes (N and C) connected by a hinge region. Both lobes bind two metal ions in synergy with carbonate (CO32-). Not only Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions but Cu2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+ ions can also bind. Lactoferrin can bind Fe3+ reversibly so it can exist as free of Fe3+ (Apo-Lf) or in association with Fe3+ (Holo-Lf) and exhibits different three dimensional structure depending upon binding to Fe3+. Apo-Lf has an open structure and holo-Lf has closed which provide resistance to proteolysis. At iron-binding site Aspirin, two Tyrosine, and Histidine amino acids are directly involved in each lobe and Arginine is bound to CO32- ions. Number and position of Cystine-residues allows intermolecular disulfide bridges and Asparagine-residues in both lobes provide several sites for N-glycosylation (Farnaud and Evans 2003). Lactoferrin is produced by mucosal epithelial mammary cells of human, cows, buffaloes, goat, horses, many other mammals and fish. It is widely distributed in body tissues and present in mucosal surfaces, specific granules of leukocytes and in biological fluids like tears, saliva, digestive fluids, seminal fluids and most abundant in milk comprising the second highest protein in human milk after casein. Concentration of lactoferrin in different species is for cow milk (80-500 mg/L), buffalo milk (50-320 mg/L), camel milk (200-728 mg/L), goat milk (98-150 mg/L) and sheep milk (20-140 mg/L) (Krol et al. 2011). Many physiological functions of lactoferrin have been attributed. It plays an important role in iron regulation, non-specific immune response, regulation of cells growth and differentiation, protection from cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant and strong antimicrobial activity against bacteria, fungi, yeast, viruses and parasites (Conneely et al. 2005). Another dominant role of lactoferrin is during involution of mammary gland. Concentration of lactoferrin increased dramatically from 0.1-0.3mg/ml in normal milk to 20-30mg/ml by 30 days in dry period. It is particularly important for bacteriostatic properties and non-specific defense against invading bacteria. Lactoferrin also affects phagocyte function and limit oxidative degeneration of cell components during inflammation and involution (Welty et al. 1976). Lactoferrin exhibits strong antimicrobial activity against different bacteria, virus, protozoa, fungi and yeast (Hancock and Janssen 2009). The antibacterial activity of lactoferrin is due to two mechanisms; by binding the iron at infection sites, making it unavailable to bacteria and direct interaction of N-terminal of lactoferrin with micro-organism (Cruz et al. 2009, Orsi 2004). Lactoferrin acts differently with Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria (Sharma et al. 2013). It damages Gram-positive cell wall through interaction with negatively charged lipoteichoic acid causing reduction in negative charge on cell wall and favor contact between lysozyme and inner peptidoglycan (Fayad 2012). Gram-negative bacteria are destroyed by interaction of lactoferrin with external lipopolysaccharides by preventing contact with Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions which cause release of lipopolysaccharides, increase permeability and ensures damage (Ochoa and Cleary 2009, Ekins et al. 2004). Milk and milk products are one of main diet in Pakistan and all over the world. During manufacturing different milk products, a number of by-products are obtained. Among them, cheese whey is produced in high volumes. It is commonly dumped off into sewerage which cause serious environmental problem as it contain high organic matter as well as loss of valuable nutrients it contain. Whey has Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD) ranges from 40,000 to 60,000 ppm (Sayadi et al. 2006) while permitted limit for BOD of domestic sewerage is 200 to 300 ppm. In order to overcome this problem there is need of effective and permanent way for treatment of whey. However, conversion of whey into non-food items like biogas is unreasonable as it is rich in unique nutrients. Now-a-days there is an interest growing on to find new ways of whey utilization throughout the world. One option is to use the whey in processes in which saleable food or pharmaceutical products can be obtained. Whey could be subjected to different techniques to isolate different components like lactose, lysozyme and immunoglobulin. Likewise, lactoferrin can be isolated from cheese whey by cation exchange chromatography without loss of its biological properties in single step method and about 90% purity (Wu et al. 2011, Moradian et al. 2014). In this study, we anticipated to use lactoferrin from bovine milk as natural antimicrobial agent. It has been shown that lactoferrin hasstrong antimicrobial activity against different bacteria, fungi, yeast, viruses and parasites (Conneely et al. 2005). In our country, very little work has been carried out onlactoferrin as natural anti-microbial agent. In fact, all over the world, the research scenario is now changing and concentrating toward the extraction of natural agents for product safety and health improvement. The lactoferrin has a potent anti-microbial activity against common foodborne pathogens. Due to the negative health effects of synthetic anti-microbial agents, the uses of natural sources are being encouraged all over the world. Our main focus of this study is to check the anti-microbial activity of lactoferrin against three pathogenic bacteria Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella enteritidis isolatedduring our previous study. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2265-T] (1).

56. Modern Technology Of Milk Processing & Dairy Products

by NIIR Board Of Dairy And Technologists.

Edition: 2nd ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: India: National Institute of research; 2005Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637 NBDT 16564 2nd 2005 Dairy] (2).

57. Laboratory Manual of Dairy Analysis

by Richmond, H. Droop.

Edition: Reprint of 1912 ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: India : Biotech Books, 2004Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.078 Richmond 17260 1st 2004 Dairy] (2).

58. Production Diseases of Dairy Animals

by Sharma, Neelesh | N. K. Singh | Goran, Bacic.

Material type: book Book Publisher: India: Satish Serial Publishing House, 2011Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 636.21420954 Sharma 27427 1st 2011 Dairy] (1).

59. Milk Production and Proccesing

by Kutty, C.I | Khamer, Sheeba.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: India : Daya Publishing House, 2008Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.1 Kutty 17131 1st 2004 Dairy] (2).

60. Dairy Cattle Feeding And Nutrition

by Miller,J.W.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: USA: Academic Press, INC 1979Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 636.2142 Miller 17953 1st 1979 Nutrition] (1).

61. Dairy Microbiology Handbook

by Robinson, Richard K.

Edition: 3rd ed.Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: [S.l.] : Wiley-Interscience, 2002Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.01579 Robinson 15079 3rd 2003 Dairy] (2).

62. Biochemistry of Milk Products

by Andrews, A T | Varley, J R.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: India : Woodhead Publishing, 1994Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 573.446371 Andrews 17253 1st 2004 Biochemistry] (1).

63. Analysis of Milk and its Products

by Milk Industry Foundation.

Edition: 2nd ed.Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: India : Biotech Books,India, 2005Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.1 MIF 17079 1st 2005 Dairy] (1).

64. Milk and Dairy Product Technology

by Spreer, Edgar.

Edition: 2nd ed.Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: India : CRC Press, 1998Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637 Spreer 19611 1st 1998 Dairy] (2).

65. Milk and Milk Products

by Varnam, Alan H.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: UK : Springer, 1995Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.1 Varnam 13592 1st 1994 Dairy] (1).

66. Advances in Dairy Animal Production

by Mudgal,VD.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: India: International book distribution company; 1995Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 636.08842 Mudgal 16653 2nd 1995 Dairy] (1).

67. Milk Composition, Production and Biotechnology

by Welch, Robert A S | Burns, Donald J W | Davis, Stephen R | Popay, A I | Prosser, Colin G.

Edition: First ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: UK: CABI; 1997Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.1 Welch 16453 1st 1997 Dairy] (1).

68. Veterinary Drug Residues : Residues in Food Producing Animals and their Products : Reference Materials and Methods

by Heitzman, R J | Heitzman, R. J.

Edition: 2nd Edition.Material type: book Book Publisher: UK : WileyBlackwell; 1994Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 363.1929 Heitzman 13641 2nd 1994 CMS] (1).

69. Development Of Cheddar Cheese By Using Crude Flowers Extract Of Citrus Aurantium (Sour Orange) As A Milk Coagulant

by Usman Mir Khan (2009-VA-510) | Mr. Ishtiaque Ahmad | Prof. Dr. Muhammad Ayaz | Mr. Hifz-ul-Rahman.

Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2015Dissertation note: Presently in Pakistan a few dairy companies are producing Cheddar cheese. Several alternative proteases obtained from different vegetable and fruit sources such as fruits, roots, latex and flowers have been recommended as rennet coagulant replacer in cheeses processing. As there is now decrease in slaughtering of young calves, natural rennet shortage occurs, so to fill it, sometimes alternates of rennet used in cheese production technology. This research project was designed to implement and introduce the use of Citrus aurantium crude flower extracts (CFE) as an economical, easily available and rennet substitute in Cheddar cheese production. CFE was evaluated for its first time usage as coagulant in Cheddar cheese production and compared with rennet for its physicochemical characteristics and sensory evaluation. Cheddar cheese was made from buffalo milk. Standardized buffalo milk was pasteurized and then cooled to inoculation temperature. It was inoculated with addition of 2% of starter culture and given stay of 20-50 minutes. Then control sample was coagulated with 0.002% rennet and other samples were coagulated by Citrus aurantium crude flower extracts (CFE) at different levels of 1%, 2 %, 3% and 4% at coagulation time. After curdling, curd was cut, stirred and whey was drained. Then milling and cheddaring of cheese blocks was done. Salting was done at the rate of 2.5%. After pressing, cheese was stored in hygienic packaging and left for ripening at 10°C for 2 to 3 months. Acceptability of newly developed Cheddar cheese using crude flower extracts (CFE) as a coagulant was evaluated by sensory evaluation using criteria of color, Cheddar cheese Summary 49 samples were analyzed for physico-chemical characteristics and sensory evaluation at 63 days of storage. The statistical analysis was carried out by using one way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) techniques under (CRD) Completely Randomized Design (Steel et al. 1987). Duncan’s Multiple Range (DMR) Test was used for significant difference comparisons (SAS 9.1 Statistical Software). The cheese prepared from using 1% and 4% CFE cheese showed higher fat contents from 0 to 63 days while CFE cheese prepared with 1% and 3% have significant fat contents and less than control sample prepared with rennet. Cheddar cheese with %, 2% and 3% showed similar 25% protein content respectively but less than 4% and rennet coagulated standard Cheddar cheese. Cheddar cheese made from 2% and 1% CFE showed slightly higher moisture content while 3% and 4% showed moisture content of 33% almost similar to the rennet coagulated Cheddar cheese which showed 32% of moisture content. The cheese prepared from using 4% CFE cheese showed highest pH of 5.57 at 0 days while after storage at 63 days pH decreased to 5.52. CFE Cheddar cheese prepared with 1%, 2% and 3% showed pH of 5.55 at 0 days and decreased to 5.52 which is standard pH of the Cheddar cheese. Salting of all cheese samples was done at the rate of 2.5%. The cheese prepared from using 2% and 3% CFE showed decrease in salt but it was higher than 1% and controlled Cheddar cheese. While 4% showed lower salt contents than all cheeses. Results showed that cheeses were made with 1% and 2% of CFE had a longer and slightly softer texture. While cheeses contained 3% and 4% CFE had semi-hard textural properties of curd similar to rennet added cheese which is similar to the standard Cheddar cheese made with rennet. Cheddar cheese with 3% and 1% were preferred by consumers instead of 2% and 4% for their better taste, texture/appearance and overall Summary 50 acceptability but it was less preferred over standard Cheddar cheese (controlled) due to the presence of bitter and intense aroma compounds of Citrus aurantium flowers. It will give a benefit to the cheese industry by introducing a new economical, nutritional and easily available rennet substitute source of milk coagulation. Pakistan is producing largest amount of Citrus aurantium, so it will improve its export in other countries for usage as an alternate of rennet and to provide economic benefits to our country. Furthermore, it will open new ways for researchers to find out the characterization of extract and enzyme of CFE. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2302-T] (1).

70. Chemical Characteristics Of Trans Free Margarine Enriched With Omega Fatty Acids Through Chia (Salvia Hispanica L.) Oil

by Muhammad Ajmal (2009-VA-495) | Prof. Dr. Muhammad Ayaz | Dr. Muhammad Nadeem | Dr. Muhammad Hayat Jaspal.

Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2015Dissertation note: Omega fatty acids has been related with low cholesterol level in blood, reduce the blood pressure, decreases the risk of heart attacks. Omega-3 PUFA is anti-carcinogenic, anti-atherogenic, anti-lipogenic, prevent the hypertension. Margarine was prepared by blending milk fat 70%, palm oil different concentration 30%, 27.5%, 25%, 22.5% and 20% T0 to T4 respectively .Chia seed oil in various proportions 0%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5% and 10% T0 to T4 respectively. Milk fat, Palm oil and chia Seed oil was characterized for free fatty acids, moisture content, saponification value, iodine value, refractive index. Solid fat index was determined at 0, 10, 20, 30 and 40˚C by the dilatometric method, melting point was determined by open capillary tube technique.Color, peroxide value, anisidine value, conjugated dienes and trienes was determined. Fatty acids composition of margarines were determined by the transformation into fatty acid methyl esters. Margarine was stored at -6±1oC, for 60-days, iodine value, peroxide anisidine values, free fatty acids, conjugated dienes and trienes was determined. Induction period of margarine was determined by oxidizing the samples under a steady stream of oxygen (20L/hour) at 120oC, on a Rancimat. Sensory evaluation was performed by a panel of ten trained panel of judges, samples was evaluated for color, smell, taste and overall acceptability on a 9-point Hedonic scale.All treatments were replicated three times, every sample was analyzed three times and data were expressed as Mean ± SD. The data was analyze by one way and two way analysis of variance technique, the difference among the treatments was made by Duncan Multiple Range Test Free fatty acids increased in all the treatments during the entire storage period from 0 day to 60 days, the content of fatty acid during storage period depend upon the degree of unsaturation. . Peroxide value increased in trans free margarine enriched with omega fatty acids through chia oil the during the storage of margarine. The rise in peroxide value at all the determination frequencies was in the order of T4> T3> T2> T1> control. Iodine value increases in trans free margarine enriched with omega fatty acids through chia oil during the storage time. The decline in iodine value of all the treatments and control was in the order of T4> T3 > T2 > T1 > control. The treatment having more unsaturated fatty acids, underwent more oxidation and yielded the higher extents of oxidation products. Anisidine value of all the treatments and control increased throughout the storage period, all the determination frequencies revealed an increasing trend, however, the rise in magnitude of oxidation products was different in all the treatments and control.Values of conjugated dienes and trienes numerically increased during the storage period, all the measurement intervals revealed an increasing trend, however, the rise in extent of oxidation products was mainly dependent upon the fatty acid composition and treatments having higher concentration of unsaturated fatty acids suffered more oxidation.Addition of chia oil in margarine did not have any impact on moisture content of margarine, moisture content of all the treatments and control was not different from each other (P>0.05). Non-significant changes melting point during storage time in margarine. Color of all the experimental margarines and control were not different from each other (P>0.05). Saponification value non-significant in treatments during storage time from 0 day to 60 days. Analysis of variance indicated that treatments had significant effect on SFI, whereas, the effect of storage and the interaction between treatments and storage was non-significant. The content of C18:3 (omega fatty acid) in margarine is significantly increased from T1 to T4 due to chia oil because it contain 68 % alpha linolenic acid. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2301-T] (1).

71. Encyclopaedia of Dairy Chemistry

by Singh, Dr. Kalyan.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: India; Anmol Publications Pvt. Ltd; 2010Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 641.371 Singh 24344 1st 2010 Dairy] (1).

72. Egg Uses and Processing Technologies :

by Sim, Jeong S | Nakai, Shuryo.

Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: UK : CABI, 1994Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.5 Sim 15542 1st 1994 Dairy] (1).

73. Chemical and Microbiological Analysis of Milk and Milk Products

by Sharma, Ramakant.

Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: India: International Book Distributing Co, 2006Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 541.371 Sharma 18478 1st 2006 Dairy] (2). Checked out (1).

74. Dairy Cattle Science / 4th ed

by Tyler, Howard | Deceased, M. E. Ensminger | State, Animal Science Iowa.

Edition: 4th ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: Newjersey: Prentice Hall, 2005Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 636.2142 Tyler 18854 4th 2006 Dairy] (1).

75. Herd Health and Production Management in Dairy Practice

by Brand, A.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: India: International Book Distributing Co., Publishing Division (IBDC), 2003Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 636.21420896 Brand 16650 1st 2003 Dairy] (1).

76. International Symposium on Buffalo Products : Proceedings of the International Symposium on Buffalo Products

by Gigli, S.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: Netherlands : Wageningen Academic Publishers, 1996Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 636.293 Gigli 18085 1st 1996 Food.Science] (2).

77. Milk and Milk Products.

by Winton,Andrew L.

Edition: 1sted.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: India] : Agrobios India, 2006Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637 Winton 24525 1st 2010 Dairy] (1). Checked out (1).

78. Milk and Milk Processing indian reprint /

by B.L., Herrington.

Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: India: Greenworld, 2000Availability: No items available Checked out (1).

79. Principles of Milk Production.

by Nevens,William Barbour.

Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: Axis books] : AGROBIOS, 2010Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.1 Nevens 24527 1st 2010 Dairy] (1).

80. Technology of Cheesemaking /

by Law,Barry A | Law, Barry A | Tamime, A. Y.

Edition: 2nd ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: USA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2010Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.3 Law 24862 2nd 2010 Dairy] (1).

81. Dairy Technology :

by Walstra, P.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: USA] : CRC Press, 1999Availability: No items available Checked out (1).

82. Dairy Microbiology Handbook

by Robinson, Richard K | Robinson, Richard.

Edition: 3rd ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: Canada : Wiley-Interscience, 2002Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.1 Robinson 15078 3rd 2002 Dairy] (3). Checked out (1).

83. Handbook on Analysis of Milk :

by Srivastava, M. K.

Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: India] : International Book Distributing Co, 2010Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.1 Srivastava 24343 1st 2010 Dairy] (1).

84. Handbook of Functional Dairy Products /

by Shortt,Colette | Shortt, Colette | O'Brien, John.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: USA : CRC Press, 2003Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.1 Shortt 17135 1st 2004 Dairy] (2).

85. Production Proccesing and Quality of Milk Products /

by Sharma, Ramakant.

Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: India : International Book Distributing Co, 2008Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.14 Sharma 20898 1st 2006 Dairy] (1).

86. Advances in Dairy Animal Production

by Mudgal,V.D.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: India: International Book Distribution company Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637 Mudgal 14306 1st 1995 Dairy] (1).

87. Modern Dairy Technology.

by Robinson, R. K | Robinson | Springer.

Edition: 2nd ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: UK : Springer, 1994Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.1 Robinson 16577 1st 1999 Dairy] (1).

88. Herd Health and Production Management in Dairy Practice /

by ET.AL, BRAND A.

Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: iNDIA : International Book Distributing Co., Publishing Division (IBDC), 2003Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637 Brand 17587 1st 2003 Dairy] (1).

89. Functional Dairy Products /

by Mattila,Tiina | Mattila-Sandholm, T | Saarela, Maria.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: USA] : Woodhead Publishing, 2003Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.1 Mattila 17338 1st 2003 Dairy] (1).

90. Feta and Related Cheeses /

by Robinson,R.K | Tamime, A. Y | Robinson, R K.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: UK] : Woodhead Publishing, 1991Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.35 Robinson 16578 2nd 1996 Dairy] (2).

91. Dairy Microbiology

by Foster,E.M.

Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: USA: Prentice Hall, n.dAvailability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637 Foster 2057BB 1st n.d Dairy] (1).

92. The Sensory Evaluation of Dairy Products /

by Clark,Stephanie | Clark, Stephanie | Costello, Michael | Drake, MaryAnne | Bodyfelt, Floyd.

Edition: 2nd ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: USA : Springer, 2008Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.1 Clark 24861 2nd 2009 Dairy] (1).

93. Handbook of Dairy Foods Analysis /

by Nollet,Lea M.L | Nollet, Leo M | Toldra, Fide.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: USA] : CRC Press, 2009Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.1 Nollet 24859 1st 2010 Dairy] (1).

94. Milk Products /

by Hill, Harry | Harvey, William Clunie.

Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: India] : Biotech Books, 2008Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.1 Harvey 14693 2nd 1999 Dairy] (3).

95. Sustainable Dairy Farming an Overview /

by Sethumadhavan, Tp.

Edition: 1/E ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: India] : Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers, 2004Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.0941 Sethumsdhavan 17117 1st 2004 Dairy] (1).

96. Dairy Microbiology

by Singh, Dr. K.

Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: India : Oxford Book Company, 2012Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637 Singh 27545 1st 2012 Dairy] (1).

97. Modern Dairy Products

by Lampert,Lincoln M.

Edition: 3rd ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: USA: Chemical Publishing Comapny, 1975Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.1 Lampert 11910 3rd 1975 Dairy] (1).

98. Animal Husbandry and Dairy Science

by Prasad,Jadish.

Edition: 3rd ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: India: Kalyani Publisher, 2001Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 637.1 Prasad 20884 3rd 2001 Dairy] (4).

99. Grass for Dairy Cattle

by Cherney, Jerome H | Cherney, Debbie J R.

Edition: First ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: UK : CABI, 1998Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 636.2086 Cherney 20795 1st 1998 Dairy] (4).

100. Ice Cream and Frozen Deserts :

by Stogo, Malcolm.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: USA] : Wiley, 1997Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 641.862 Stogo 15793 1st 1998 Dairy] (1).



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