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101. Handbook of Applied Nutrition, Dietotherapy & Diet Management

by Punekar, Mangala | D'Souza, Jerry.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: New Delhi: SBS Publishers, 2010Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 615.854 Punekar 24675 1st 2010 Food.Science] (1).

102. Practical Methods in Food Analysis

by Berwal, J. S.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: India: ATPA; 2004Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.07 Berwal 17734 1st 2004 Food.Science] (1).

103. Elements of Food and Nutrition

by Dr. Javaid Aziz Awan.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Faislabad: Unitech Communications; 2011Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 664 Awan 29704 4th 2011 Food.Science] (2), UVAS Library [Call number: 664 Awan 29705 4th 2011 Food.Science] (1).

104. Fundamentals of Food Process Engineering

by Toledo, Romeo T.

Edition: 3rd ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: USA: Springer, 2007Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664 Toledo 22884 3rd 2007 Food.Science] (1).

105. Plant Nutrition for Food Security

by Roy, R. N.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: India: Discovery Publishing House; 2007Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664 Roy 27543 1st 2007 Food.Science] (1).

106. Methods of Analysis of Food Components and Additives / 2nd ed

by Otles, Semih.

Edition: 2nd ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: USA: CRC Press, 2012Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.06 Otles 27555 2nd 2012 Food.Science] (1).

107. Encyclopedia of Foods : A Guide to Healthy Nutrition

by Experts from Dole Food Company | Experts from The Mayo Clinic | Experts from UCLA Center for Health.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: USA : Academic Press, 2002Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 641.3003 UCLA 16011 1st 2002 Food.Science] (1).

108. Advanced Human Nutrition

by Medeiros, Denis M.

Edition: 2nd ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: USA : Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2012Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 612.3 Medeiros 27078 2nd 2012 Food.Science] (1).

109. Techniques of Food Analysis

by Winton, L. Andrew.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: India: Agrobios India, 2006Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.07 Winton 20813 1st 2006 Food.Science] (1).

110. The Cambridge World History of Food

by Kiple, Kenneth F | Ornelas, Kriemhild Cone.

Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: USA: Cambridge University Press, 2000Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 641.309 Kiple 15561 Vol.1 2000 Food.Science] (1).

111. Nutrition : Concepts and Controversies / 10th ed

by Whitney, Sizer.

Edition: 10th ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: USA: Thomson, 2006Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 613.2 Whitney 23687 10th 2006 Food.Science] (1).

112. Food Microbiology

by Dr. Sharath Chandra Patil | Dr. Ramakant Naidu.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: India: Campus Books; 2010Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.001579 Patil 31086 1st 2010 Food.Science] (2).

113. More Baking Problems Solved

by Cauvain, S P | Young, Linda.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: UK : Woodhead Publishing, 2009Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.752 Cauvain 23630 1st 2009 Food.Science] (1).

114. Determination of Veterinary Residues in Food

by Crosby, Neil.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: USA : CRC Press, 1991Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.07 Crosby 16336 1st 1991 Food.Science] (1).

115. International Symposium on Buffalo Products : Proceedings of the International Symposium on Buffalo Products

by Gigli, S.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: Netherlands : Wageningen Academic Publishers, 1996Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 636.293 Gigli 18085 1st 1996 Food.Science] (2).

116. Diet Planning for Diseases

by Maimun Nisha.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: India: Kalpaz Publications; 2006Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 613.2 Nisha 20803 1st 2006 Food.Science] (1).

117. Agro-Food Marketing

by Padberg, Daniel I | Ritson, Christopher | Albisu, Luis.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: UK ; CAB International in association with the International Centre for Advanced Mediterranean Agronomic Studies(CIHEAM), 1997Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 635.0688 Padberg 15402 1st 1997 Food.Science] (1).

118. Microbiological Analysis of Food and Water

by Maier, E. A.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Amsterdam; Elesvier: 1998Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.001579 Maier 20118 1st 1998 Food.Science] (1).

119. Food Processing and Preservation

by Dr. Javaid Aziz Awan.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Pakistan: Unitech Communications; 2011Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664 Awan 29724 1st 2011 Food.Science] (1).

120. Nutrition Education : Linking Research, Theory and Practice

by Contento, Isobel R.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Boston: Jones and Bartlett Publishers, 2007Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 613.2 Contento 23284 1st 2007 Food.Science] (1).

121. Nutritional Sciences : From Fundamentals to Food

by McGuire, Michelle | Beerman, A. Kethy.

Edition: 2nd Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: USA: Wadsworth Cengage Learning; 2011Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 613.2 McGuire 24670 2nd 2011 Food.Science] (1).

122. Fruit Processing : Nutrition, Products and Quality Management

by Arthey, D | Ashurst, P. R.

Edition: 2nd ed.Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Gaithersburg, MD : Aspen Publishers, 2001Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.8 Arthey 27084 2nd 2001 Food.Science] (1).

123. Krause's Food & Nutrition Therapy / 12th ed

by Mahan, L. Kathleen | Escott-Stump, Sylvia.

Edition: 12th ed.Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: St. Louis, Mo. : Saunders/Elsevier, 2008Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 615.854 Mahan 23686 12th 2008 Food.Science] (1).

124. Assessment Of Correlation Between Food Choices And Fertility Status In Females

by Tamkenat Mansoor (2013-VA-923) | Dr. Muhammad Nasir | Ms. Amina Chughtai | Mr. Muhammad Bilal.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2015Dissertation note: The changing lifestyles and eating patterns have resulted in a number of fertility related problems, especially in females. Initially it was thought that only morbidly increased or decreased body weights were the causative factors in cases of infertility and sub fertility but it has been observed that a lot of women with normal body weight are also increasingly finding it difficult to conceive. Similarly obese and underweight women have also been seen to reproduce normally. Thus, in order to have a better understanding of the relationship between food and fertility we need to compare the eating patterns of fertile women with those of infertile ones. Various eating patterns are associated, either negatively or positively, with the fertility status of females. At least 50 fertile and 50 infertile females, attending the OPDs at health centers in Gujrat, during the time of 6 months or until the benchmark of 50 control and 50 cases is not achieved, will be recruited and interviewed through a proposed questionnaire. Other than Food frequency checklist, social, medical and sexual history of the females will also be included in the questionnaire. Filled questionnaires will be analyzed using Minitab. Comparisons will be made between the food choices of fertile and infertile group using t-test and other relevant tests. The results of the proposed study will help to assess the association between the eating patterns and fertility status of females and help the practitioners to educate and better assist their patients to conceive successfully. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2415-T] (1).

125. Biotechnology and Future of Food

by Sanjay Sharma.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: India: Random Publications; 2013Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.042 Sharma 31082 1st 2013 Food.Science] (1).

126. Essential Oils and Their Applications

by Kuntal Das.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: New Delhi: NIPA; 2013Availability: No items available Checked out (1).

127. Food Processing Novel Technologies

by Penchalaraju M | Kavita, C | Kirthy Reddy, M.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: India: Kalyani Publishers; 2015Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.07 Kirthy 31080 1st 2015 Food.Science] (1).

128. Techniques of Food Analysis

by Winton, Andrew L.

Edition: 1stMaterial type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: India: Agrobios India; 2014Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.07 Winton 31081 1st 2014 Food.Science] (1).

129. More Food Styling for Photographers and Stylists : A Guide to Creating Your Own Appetizing Art

by Bellingham, Linda | Baygee, Jean Ann.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: UK: Elsevier; 2012Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 778.96413 Bellingham 31085 1st 2012 Food.Science] (1).

130. Milk Testing: The Laboratory Control of Milk

by Choda, Dr. Pradeep Kumar.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: New Delhi: Random Publications; 2016Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 614.32 Choda 31087 1st 2016 Food.Science] (1).

131. Mycotoxins in Food : Detection and Control

by Olsen, M | Magan, N.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: Boca Raton, Fla : CRC Press, 2004Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 615.95295 Olsen 27813 1st 2004 Food.Science] (1).

132. Assessment Of Food Safety Knowledge, Attitude Andpractices (Kap) Among Food Handlers At Hospitals In Lahore

by Barkat Ali (2009-VA-484) | Dr. Naureen Naeem | Dr. SanaullahIqbal | Dr Saima Inayyat.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2016Dissertation note: Food safety is an alarming issue now a days in Pakistan as many food borne illnesses, diseases and spoilage of food occur due to poor knowledge, attitude and practices of food handlers about food safety and hygiene. Food safety is a scientific discipline describing preparation, handling and storage of food in different ways to prevent food borne illness. In present era there is much improvement in food preparation, serving, washing, handling and storage. Food safety knowledge, attitude and good practices which are aimed to produce safe food. All food handlers have not good knowledge, attitude and good practices to ensure food safety.In the present study the cross sectional survey of 500 food handlers of public sector hospitalsof Lahore were conducted to evaluate current food safety knowledge, attitude and practices adopted by them. The evaluation was done by using modified questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of food safety knowledge, attitude and practices among food handlers.SPSS version 22.0was used for all data analyses. Descriptive statistics including frequencies percentageswere calculated for all variables as appropriate.Educating, training and promoting positive attitude of food handlers would improve the status of food hygiene knowledge, attitudes and practices. Research is needed to focus on how to change the culture and behavior of the food handlers, and to improve their adherence and compliance with hand washing.The studyhighlighted the situation of current food safety knowledge, attitude and practices among food handlers of public sector hospitals in Lahore. Food safety, personal hygiene training as a means of improving food safety, awareness of food safety, among food handlers can prevent foodborne diseases and to minimize the health consequences associated with the consumption of unsafe foods in Pakistan. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2451-T] (1).

133. Determination Of Heavy Metals In Cauliflower And Carrot Grown In Suburbs Of Lahore

by Hafiz Muhammad Azam Arif (2013-VA-849) | Dr. Zubair Farooq | Dr. Sana ullah Iqbal | Dr. Saima Inayat.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2015Dissertation note: Vegetables are the fresh and edible portions of the herbaceous plants. They classified as seasonal vegetables but they also classified as root, tuber, shoot, flower, fruit and leafy on the base of mode of consumption. Each of the categories mentioned above have its own role in human body. They play a vital role in human health due to their higher nutritional values. They are major source of macro and micro nutrients which required by the human body for optimal functioning. They are not only involved for normal body functioning but they also disease preventive in nature. Heavy metals get entry through different routes and accumulate in edible and inedible portions of the vegetables in quantity enough to cause clinical problems to humans and animals. This study was designed to assess the level of heavy metals in vegetables in different districts of Punjab. Heavy metal is defined as metallic element usually toxic in nature with high density and atomic weight. As they are toxic in nature they accumulate in different parts of the vegetables and lead to several health complications in humans. Some of these metals are of nutritionally important for human health in small quantities and referred as trace elements which include zinc, iron, copper etc. They are among the major toxicants in vegetables which may cause chronic diseases in the kidney and liver of humans and causes disruption of numerous biochemical processes leading to cardiovascular, nervous, kidney and bone diseases. Open crown vegetables like cauliflower have more chances of infestation in suburbs due to waste water irrigation as compared to intact skin vegetables especially grown away from suburbs. Moreover, vegetables treated under clean sanitary conditions can have low levels of heavy metals as compared to the untreated ones. There are different sources of heavy metals which include waste water irrigation, industrial waste water and soil pollution which associated with industrialization and agricultural activities such as atmospheric deposition, waste disposal, waste incineration, vehicle exhaust, fertilizer application and long term application of sewage sludge in agriculture land. Waste water contains sufficient amount toxic heavy metals which cause clinical problems. In the present study two vegetable cauliflower (Brassica oleracea) and carrot (Dascusorrota) were collected from suburbs of Lahore. While samples of cauliflower were include from various districts of Punjab. The heavy metals Pb, Zn, Cr, Ni, Ca, Mg, K and Na were determined in cauliflower and carrot from suburbs; While Pb, Zn, Cr and Ni were observed in cauliflower from various districts of Punjab. Digested vegetable samples were analyzed through Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The highest levels for heavy metals (ppm) Lead, Zinc, Chromium and Nickel in Lahore for cauliflower and carrot was (2.2267±0.0251, 2.2317±0.0076), (5.7100±0.0360,5.0333±0.2516), (1.1133±0.1154, 1.7333±0.0763), (2.466±0.1040, 2.4000±0.3605) respectively. There was a significant difference in both vegetables. Difference in concentration in both vegetables is due to the surface area of both vegetables as cauliflower has large surface area as compared to carrot. The highest levels for heavy metals (ppm) Lead, Zinc, Chromium and Nickel in Gujranwala for cauliflower was (2.3266±0.0145, 4.5966±0.0152, 0.9333±0.0152, 2.2467±0.0251) respectively. The highest levels for heavy metals (ppm) Lead, Zinc, Chromium and Nickel in Sheikhupura for cauliflower was (1.9000±0.0200, 6.043±0.0513, 0.933±0.0152, 2.490±0.0100) respectively. The highest levels for heavy metals (ppm) Lead, Zinc, Chromium and Nickel in Faisalabad for cauliflower was (1.928±0.0104, 5.736±0.0156, 1.193±0.0057, 2.476±0.152) respectively. The highest levels for heavy metals (ppm) Lead, Zinc, Chromium and Nickel in Kasoor for cauliflower was (1.900±0.0200, 6.043±0.0513, 0.933±0.0152, 2.490±0.0100) respectively. Each of the city have different concentration of the metals, several reasons for this variation which include medium on which these vegetables are growing, water used for irrigation, application of agricultural products, poor agricultural practices and post-harvest treatment which include harvesting procedure, washing of vegetables with unsafe water and transfer from long rooted areas. Uptake behavior of these metals and minerals by vegetables also affect it. The transfer factor (TF) of different heavy metals from soil to vegetation is one of the key components of human exposure to metals through the food chain. The highest TF valueis found for Zn because Zn is more mobile in nature. This study will provide a baseline data and there is a need for intensive sampling of the same for quantification of the results. Soil, plant and water quality monitoring, together with the prevention of metals entering the plant, is a prerequisite in order to prevent potential health hazards of wastewater irrigation. By using good agricultural practices including use of less agricultural chemical products and sewage water should be used after proper treatment. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2454-T] (1).

134. Evaluation Of Microbiological Quality Ofshawarma Sold By The Street Vendors Of Lahore

by Sana Adrees (2013-VA-896) | Dr. Zabair Farooq | Dr. Muhammad Nasir | Prof. Dr. Aftab Ahmed Anjum.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2015Dissertation note: Food safety is a scientific discipline describes handling, preparation and storage of food that prevents food borne diseases.It includes a number of ways that must be followed to avoid potentially severe health hazards.The tracks within this line of thought are safety between the market and consumer. With the fast pace of life the consumption of fast food is going to increase day by day in Lahore. It is imperative to prepare food at good hygienic conditions because of its perishability. The usual thougt is that food should be safe in the market and the concern is safe delivery and preparation of food for the consumer. Microorganisms affecting food comes from natural micro flora or are introduced by manufacturing steps ranging from processing storage and distribution. In some cases these micro flora have no effect on the food and can be consumed without consequence, but those that are introduced during course of processing depending on type and level of contamination can spoil the food and cause food borne illnesses. Food can transmit diseases from one person to another as well as serve as growth medium for bacteria that can cause food poisonoing. In the developed countries there are standards for food, whereas in less developed countries the main issue is the availability of safe water supply which is one of the critical item. The present research work was undertaken to investigate the microbial count in shawarma which is a vended food. Samples collected from Anarkali,Wahdat road and Islampura showed high microbial count which shows contamination due to poor handling and hygienic conditions and improper storage conditionswhile the samples taken from Fortress, Gulberg having less microbial count as compared to these areas. High microbial load in street foods occur due to improper food handling, unhygienic food preparation and processing, cooking and storage at inappropriate temperature. Consumer, food vendors and all type people should be aware of food hygiene, public health, implications of consuming contaminated foods, causative diseases. Food safety rules and implementation of food regulatory laws in food preparation, serving and preservation should be strongly maintained to avoid contamination problems and food-borne diseases. Following points should be strongly observed and maintained for future work and further investigative study to improve the quality of shawarama. 1. Ensuring regular inspection and periodical check on these food preparation procedures. 2.Continuous lab test and analytical lab analysis to check the unwanted presence of any new harmful agents in these foods to ensure food safety for consumers. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2455-T] (1).

135. Evaluation Of Microbial Quality Of Burger Sold By Roadside Fast Food Centers In Various Regions Of Lahore

by Nimra Khalid (2013-VA-900) | Dr. Zubair Farooq | Dr. Muhammad Nasir | Prof. Dr. Aftab Ahmed Anjum.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2015Dissertation note: Food safety actions need to cover the entire food chain, from production to consumption. The implementation of food safety include safety between industry and the market and then between the market and the consumer. In considering industry to market practices, food safety considerations include the origins of food including the practices relating to food labeling, food hygiene, food additives and pesticides residues, as well as policies for certification systems for foods. Food industry regarding safety issue is one of the most unseen areas of policy in developing countries, especially in Pakistan. As a result, food systems in these countries are not always as well controlled and comprehensive as in the mechanized world. This situation is exacerbated by an ever increasing population, rapid urbanization and, most importantly, a lack of the economic and practical resources needed to hold a sound food safety system. As a result, people in developing countries are continuously facing a wide range of potential food safety risks. Food borne illness is a disease caused by consuming contaminated food or drink.There are more than 250 known food borne diseases. Food can transmit disease from individual to individual as well as serve as a growth medium for bacteria that can cause food poisoning. Today, people try to save as much time as possible due to the requisite to cope with many tasks within restricted time. In many cases people who have busy schedule don’t have enough time to cook food therefore prefer to eat fast food like burger, shawarma, fries etc. from fast food centers. The present research was undertaken to investigate the microbial load of the chicken burger samples (n=96) collected aseptically from different regions of Lahore. Samples were collected in sterile plastic bags and analyzed for microbial load immediately after collection in Microbiology lab of University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences. Nutrient agar was used to perform Total Plate Count, Mackonkey Agar was used for total coliform count, Manitol salt agar was used to count Staphylococcus Aureus and SalmonellaShigella agar was used to detect Salmonella. The findings of the current study showed that samples taken multinational restaurant have less contamination than from local fast food centers. While among local fast food centers Liberty, Fortress, Anarkali and Akbarimandi have lesser microbial count than samples collected from Ichra, moon market, Mori gate. The difference in microbial load is due to improper food handling, processing, cooking and storage temperature, time and manufacturing practices of the food handlers. After conducting my research I concluded that following points should be strongly observed and maintained to improve the quality of chicken burger in local fast food centers • Ensuring regular inspection and periodical check on these food centers • Continuous lab test and analytical lab analysis to check the unwanted presence of any new harmful agents in these foods to ensure food safety for consumer. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2456-T] (1).

136. Nutritional, Microbiological And Organoleptic Evaluation Of Yoghurt Prepared From Goat-Buffalo Milk Blends

by Noor Haider (2009-VA-661) | Dr. Muhammad Nasir | Prof. Dr. Makhdoom Abdul Jabbar | Prof. Dr. Muhammad Abdullah.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2011Dissertation note: Due to the high nutritional quality, goat milk is considered important daily food. But in our country, less usage of goat milk is due to lack of information about its basic nutrients and nutritional benefits, which provides less profit to the goat owners. Present study has been designed to prepare yoghurt from goat-buffalo milk blends for physico-chemical, nutritional and microbiological evaluation and to find out the best goat-buffalo milk blend for yoghurt preparation through organoleptic acceptability studies. Raw goat and buffalo milk was collected from University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Pattoki Campus, Pakistan and transferred to laboratory for analysis. After yoghurt preparation, chemical analysis was conducted for total solids, pH, ash content, lactose, cholesterol, protein, acidity and then physical analysis for viscosity and syneresis was conducted. Samples of yoghurt were microbiological analyzed for total viable count of Lactobacillus acidophilus, yeast, molds, coliforms by using different media. Yoghurt was also studied for sensory and nutritional evaluation after 0, 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 days of storage at 4 °C. The data obtained was statistically evaluated through two way ANOVA by applying CRD. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2522-T] (1).

137. Evaluation Of The Microbiological Quality Of Ice Cream Sold At Local Shops In Lahore

by Muhammad Bilal (2009-VA-492 | Dr. Naureen Naeem | Dr. Sana Ullah Iqbal | Prof. Dr. Aftab Ahmed Anjum.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2016Dissertation note: Ice cream is a delicious, wholesome, nutritious frozen dairy food. It is noticed that generally manufacturing of ice cream on small scale production units like local shops doesn't totally follow the standard procedures of ice cream production. Ice cream can be contaminated with microorganisms if some ingredients have been added after pasteurization or by means of improper sanitation of the equipment and environment. Microbiological quality of ice cream reflects hygienic practice in production and is an indication of food safety. There was variation in quality of locally produced ice cream in different areas of Lahore. Food safety is a scientific discipline describes handling, preparation and storage of food that prevents food borne diseases. It includes a number of ways that must be followed to avoid potentially severe health hazards. The tracks within this line of thought are safety between the market and consumer with the fast pace of life the consumption of fast food is going to increase day by day in Lahore. It is imperative to prepare food at good hygienic conditions because of its perishability. The usual thought is that food should be safe in the market and the concern is safe delivery and preparation of food for the consumer. Microorganisms affecting food comes from natural microflora or are introduced by manufacturing steps ranging from processing storage and distribution. In some cases these micro flora have no effect on the food and can be consumed without consequence, but those that are introduced during course of processing depending on type and level of contamination can spoil the food and cause food borne illnesses. Summary 49 Food can transmit diseases from one person to another as well as serve as growth medium for bacteria that can cause food poisoning. In the developed countries there are standards for food, whereas in less developed countries the main issue is the availability of safe water supply which is one of the critical item. Foodborne illness is a problem resulting from the consumption of contaminated food, bacteria, viruses, or parasites, natural toxins, chemicals that contaminate food. For this study total 108 locally produced samples of ice cream were carried from different areas of Lahore. Mughalpura, Sadar, Model town, Gulberg, Town ship and Johar town. 6 shops from each area and 3 samples from each shop were purchased and put in the sampling box with ice packs. Samples were analyzes for microbial load in microbiology Lab of University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences. Each sample was analyzed for microbiological analysis (Enumeration of Total Viable Count (TVC), Enumeration of Total Coliform Count (TCC), Enumeration of Total Staphylococcal Count (TSC) and detection of salmonella spp. Nutrient agar was used to perform Total plate count, Mackonky agar was used for Total coliform count, Mannitol salt agar was used to count S.aureus , Salmonella Shigella agar for Salmonella detection . Each analysis was performed 3 times. The samples collected from Mughalpura, Sadar and Model town were highly contaminated having more microbial count which shows contamination due to poor handling and hygienic conditions while Gulberg, Johar town and Town ship having less contaminated. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2543-T] (1).

138. Determination Of Heavy Metals In Beverages Sold By Roadside Vendors From Different Public Places Of Lahore

by Numan Shoukat (2009-VA-504) | Dr. Naureen Naeem | Dr. Sanaullah Iqbal | Dr. Saima Inyat.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2016Dissertation note: Food safety is serious issue now a days in Pakistan as many food borne diseases occur due to consumption of unsafe local beverages and soft drinks. Use of polluted water in locally produce beverages and juices without any treatment liable to cause diseases. In summer beverages are commonly used to quench the thirst in Pakistan due to hot weather. Excessive use of such type of drinks cause different diseases like hypertension, gastrointestinal problem, liver and kidney failure, and also carcinogenic. So in this project, concentrations of various heavy metals including Lead, Cadmium and Iron were determined in local beverages (roadside vendors) from different public places of Lahore, Punjab Pakistan. Total 200 samples of five different types of beverages were collected from ten different public places of Lahore. 50 samples were collected with the interval of 15 days. Sampling were repeated three times from four different road side vendors of same areas. The analyses will be carried out using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) with electro thermic atomization in graphite furnace for the determination of the total content of lead (Pb) iron (Fe) and cadmium (Cd). The concentration of the digested soft drink samples will be derived from the regression equation and the samples will analyzed in duplicates. Present study was conducted at the Department of Environmental Sciences, UVAS Lahore for the duration of four months. The data thus obtained from this research was evaluated through descriptive statistics. And the results of concentration of lead, iron and cadmium are not significant and not according to Standards of Pakistan. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2542-T] (1).

139. Effect Of Inulin Present In Chicory Roots On The Diabetes

by Saeed Ahmad (2009-VA-642) | Dr. Sana Ullah Iqbal | Dr. Muhammad Nasir | Dr. Saima Inayat.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2016Dissertation note: Diabetes is metabolic disease in which there are high glucose levels over a long period of time. The principle symptoms of high glucose are expanded thirst, regular pee, and expanded craving. Diabetes is a disease that influences the way the body uses food from the blood. It is normally a hereditarily issue of digestion system, that is showed by the inability to tolerate carbohydrates and insulin inadequacy. In 2014 around 387 million individuals have diabetes the whole way across the world and 90% of the cases were of Type 2 diabetes which is equivalent to 8.3% of the grown-up population. This proportion was equivalent for both ladies and men. From years 2012 to 2014, it is evaluated that 1.5 to 4.9 million deaths each year was because of DM. The danger of death is twice with diabetes. The normal number of individuals with diabetes is 592 million by 2035 by this rate. With more than 16 million individuals America have some type of this disease (DM). 700,000 new instances of DM are analyzed each year. Diabetes is increasing at very high rate in Pakistan. There are nearly 7.1 million DM patients in Pakistan and it is also estimated that if DM continually develop at this rate then 11.4 million patients of diabetics will be there and Pakistan would rank 10th in the world in 2030. This study is designed due to this alarming rate of diabetes in our country. Inulin present in chicory roots may be used to optimize blood glucose level in diabetic patients. Total 20 diabetic participants aged 30 to 40 years, present in Lahore, were selected for this study in two groups with 10 each participants. Chicory root powder was used as a source of inulin. 60 Chicory roots was purchased from the market. Then cleaned from dirt and then it was dried with the help of oven at temperature 55˚c.Then this dried roots were grinded with the help of grinder machine. Two group were formed. One group was control group that used only allopathic medicines specifically for diabetes. Other group was inulin group that used chicory root powder. Inulin group used both chicory root powder and medicines 1st week of the study. This was done only to ensure no side effect of chicory root powder on the participants. Next week when there was no adverse effect then participants were advised to use half of the medicine along with the chicory root powder. Then after 13 days when glucose level of the participant was on the course then eliminated the medicines and told them to use only 10 grams of chicory root powder daily. Glucose level of these patients was tested daily by the glucometer for two weeks. Then after every 5 to 7 days for 3 months. Then at the end of this period HBA1C test was carried at the hospital laboratory. In this experimental trial, we investigated the effect chicory root supplementation especially inulin has on glucose level of type 2 diabetic patients. Our results showed that three months of chicory root supplementation significantly decreased blood glucose level. My study reveals that inulin as a fiber didn’t control the diabetes but have a little effect on the glucose intake in the blood due to its fibrous nature. Data showed that the inulin supplementation slightly reduce the glucose level in the blood. First week of the supplementation was along with medicines and data showed reduction in the glucose level of blood. At initial day the average random blood glucose level was 251.2 ± 60.1 mg/dl and after 7 days it was 220 ± 53.1 mg/dl and at the end of 90th day it was 195 ± 52.3 which shows that inulin has a reducing effect on the diabetes to some 61 extent. In this study we can conclude that inulin containing chicory roots has a positive effect on the reduction of glucose level of blood (p < 0.001). The patients that use 10 grams of chicory root powder constantly were able to lower their blood glucose level and HbA1c. But it cannot be used as a medicine replacement in diabetic patients because it does not control blood glucose level to the normal range. Future Recommendations: I recommend in future that effect of inulin on the diabetic patients should be checked in relation to amount of medicines given to the patients. Researchers should check that what happens when inulin is used with different amount of medicines in diabetic patients. And also what happens when different amount of inulin is given to diabetic patients along with same medicine. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2568-T] (1).

140. Impact Of Nutrition Education On Knowledge About Osteoporosis Among Women

by Aroob Hussain (2012-VA-399) | Ms. Tahreem Hussain | Dr. Sana Ullah Iqbal | Dr. Mamoona Chaudhary.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2016Dissertation note: Osteoporosis is a serious public health problem. It leads to compromised bone health and quality of life deteriorates. As there is no cure to it, it is important to prevent it. The peak bone mass can be achieved prior to the age of 30. Therefore, prevention is most effective if done in childhood and adolescent. About 9.9 million people in Pakistan have osteoporosis of which 7.2 million are women. The occurrence of Pakistan is expected to rise in the coming years with an estimated prevalence of 11.3 million in 2020, and 12.9 million in 2050. Therefore, the high prevalence of osteoporosis in Pakistan is of public health concern. The nutrition knowledge about osteoporosis in women was improved after nutrition education. The study design was randomized pretest posttest control group design. A sample of 150 females aged between 16 - 30 years visiting Pakistan Society for the Rehabilitation and Disabled were selected through purposive sampling. Data was collected through closed ended questionnaire. Sample was divided into two equal groups; Control Group and Experimental Group. Both groups were pretested. The baseline knowledge of both the groups was assessed using a 27-item questionnaire. After pretesting nutrition education was imparted to the experimental group through various materials. Nutrition education was given once a week for 2 months (8 weeks). Each education session was of 30 minutes approximately. The educational tools used were handouts for participants and multimedia power point presentations. After 2 months, both control and experimental group were post-tested to assess the effectiveness of nutrition education. The data analysis was done using SPSS v.20 software. Pearson’s Chi-square test was used and qualitative data was presented in the form of descriptive statistics. Analysis of data was carried out by making tables and clustered bar charts. The study concluded that intervention (nutrition education) is effective on improving the knowledge and attitudes about Osteoporosis among females aged 16-30 years. The findings are in conformity with studies from Pakistan and abroad. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2583-T] (1).

141. Linking Childhood Obesity With Excessive Use Of Digital Media

by Hafiza Nida Rehmat (2014-VA-534) | Dr. Sana Ullah Iqbal | Ms. Tehreem Hussain | Prof. Dr. Mansur Ud Din Ahmad.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2016Dissertation note: Obesity is one of the most prevalent problems all over the world particularly in children and adolescence that could lead to sedentary behavior and influence the dietary habits of children. The television food commercials have bad impact on children and increased brand advertisements may lead to unhealthy consumption patterns. The hypothesis of the study was excessive use of digital media can lead to weight gain in children. The sample of 400 children of class 4-6 was taken from private schools, Daar-e-Arqam school, Himayat-e-Islam higher secondary school and Al-Huda Educational Institute, Lahore.. Children of age 9-11 years was included from middle class group (monthly income 30,000-70,000/-). The demographic measurements were obtained by each student while having a personal interview with them. The anthropometric measurements (heights, weights, BMI, TSF, MUAC and MAMC) were taken by using specific measuring tools. The height were measured by stadiometers, weights by weighing machine and other anthropometric measurements by abs plastic medical body fat skinfold caliper meter. Growth charts were used to assess the degree of malnutrition (over nutrition or under nutrition). The questionnaire was filled by asking questions to the children in order to assess the relationship of body weight and digital media. Descriptive statistics and chi square, Pearson’s correlation (SPSS version 20) was applied on the data to assess either digital media has positive or negative relationship with children’s body weight. The age, gender and class are significantly associated with nutritional status of the students. The students of Lahore Pakistan like to use mobile and laptop and the duration of using mobile or laptop is positively associated with health status of the individual. Student has very busy life and they do not have spare time to watch television so it is not significantly 49 associated with health status of the individual. In such case, students have low physical activity and increase sedentary behavior. Parents do not allow their children to go out for games or activities because of security concerns or restrictions on girls especially. The physical activity is negatively associated with health status of the individual. The dietary habits of the individuals are badly affected due to the trends of junk and fast food consumption but it is not associated with food marketing campaigns in this study. The food marketing campaigns target young children for selling their products by advertising them in prime time of children programs but due to busy schedule of the individuals , they do not have time to be effected by them. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2579-T] (1).

142. Food Microbiology Protocols

by Spencer, John F.T | Ragout Spencer, Alicia L.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: India: Raj Press; 2007Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.001579 Spencer 31707 1st 2007 Food.Science] (1).

143. Effect Of Nutrition Education On Dietary Compliance Of Pre-Diabetics

by Aniqa Maqbool (2014-VA-520) | Ms. Tahreem Hussain | Dr.Sanaullah Iqbal | Prof. Dr. Mansur-ud-Din Ahmad.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2016Dissertation note: Pre-diabetes or borderline diabetes, a condition characterized by impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance is a wakeup call to forestall the path leading to diabetes and its related complications. Nutrition education is thought to be a cornerstone in the prevention of chronic diseases. Intervening at right time through nutrition education will help to minimize the risk of diabetes. The current study hypothesized that nutrition education can improve dietary compliance in pre-diabetics. The current study was carried out on 400 participants who were interviewed and screened by arranging diabetes awareness camps arranged at Hafiz Medical and Diagnostic Centre. Filled questionnaires were analyzed using SPSS version 21. Descriptive and inferential statistics was done to analyze data. The results of the current study showed positive effect of nutrition education on dietary compliance with improved blood glucose levels. The results showed compliance to go up with increasing education level (100% compliant in post-graduation) and importantly in extremely obese people (100%). Furthermore, it was observed that total calorie intake was significantly reduced by decrease in the intake of bakery products, starchy vegetables, refined sugar, sweets and desserts, fried products and sweetened carbonated beverages from baseline food consumption of pre-diabetics. Also, it was noted that consumption of fresh fruits, non-starchy and leafy vegetables was increased although not statistically significant but it replaced the refined carbohydrate intake thereby showing reduction in total percentage of carbohydrate consumed from total calories. Summary 83 Protein intake was statistically significant whereas percentage of fat consumed from total calories was not statistically significant between groups. Moreover, compliant pre-diabetics had significant improvement in fasting blood glucose levels on monitoring after 2 months of nutrition education whereas no statistically significant change was observed in anthropometrics measurements between groups although slight decrease was assessed in experimental group. Therefore, it can be concluded from the current study that nutrition education can definitively improve dietary compliance in pre-diabetics by good nutritional and lifestyle counseling. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2604-T] (1).

144. Evaluation Of Microbial Quality And Sensory Attributes Of Fresh Fruit Juices Sold At Various Places Of Lahore

by Anam Sajid (2013-VA-964) | Dr. Zubair Farooq | Dr. Sanaullah Iqbal | Dr. Aftab Ahmed Anjum.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2016Dissertation note: The beverage industry in Pakistan has emerged as a progressive sector over the years. Juices are rich source of nutrients containing vitamins minerals but the microbial quality and sensory attributes of street vended, corners and restaurant juices is not at satisfied level. Juices squeezed from fresh fruits and vegetables contain microorganisms which are potentially hazardous to public health Therefore this study aimed to evaluate the microbial quality and sensory attributes of fresh fruit juices sold at various places of Lahore. The selling and consumption of juices are never stopped on nutritional grounds as well as livelihood of street vendors. It is alarming situation for suitable agency to take some necessary action, make guidelines to prevent potential food poisoning from juices that contain pathogenic bacteria, and find natural antimicrobials from plants that control spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms in juices. Microbial quality and sensory attributes of Street vended, corners and restaurant juices are not in good condition. Sample of 243 juices of three types, pineapple, peach pomegranate took from three categories, collected from 9 towns of Lahore (for 1 town 9 from each flavor that makes 27 from each town). The categories were juices from Street Vender (SV), Juice Corner (JC) and Restaurants (RT). All the samples were evaluated for sensory attributes (appearance, color, smell, taste and overall acceptability) by using 15-point hedonic scale and microbiological parameters, Aerobic Plate Count (APC), Total Coliform Count (TCC), Total Staphylococcus Count (TSC) and Salmonella detection.Data was analyzed statistically by theone way ANOVA for sensory evaluation and microbial count with 5% probability. Means were compared by LSD (least significant difference) test (Steel et al.,1997). Results of my study indicates that juice samples collected from SV of various areas of Lahore showed very high number of microbiological counts and got very low score for its sensory attributes. While samples collected from JC showed microbiological counts less than SV and sensory attributes scores more than juices from SV. This was not only due to poor hygienic quality of these juices but also places consumers at a high risk of contracting food-borne infections. Lack of sanitary conditions in street vended juice stalls and the occurrence of pathogenic bacteria in juices are alarming enough for an immediate action by the suitable agency. Regular monitoring of the quality of fruit juices for human consumption must be introduced to avoid any future pathogen outbreaks. Juices took from RT revealed very low microbiological counts and very good score on hedonic scale which shows that they have good hygienic conditions. Their preparation methods and surrounding environment are clean. At the end of this study we concluded that there was significant discrimination among the categories and the varieties of fresh fruit juice vendors as well as among the different towns. The microbial quality and sensory acceptability of fresh fruit juices sold at various locations of Lahore were not satisfied and we have to take step to make the conditions of our street vendors and juice corners better by giving them proper training about personal and environmental hygiene so that consumers can use the safe juices free from contamination. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2603-T] (1).

145. Study Of Effect Of Heat On Aflatoxin Reduction In Chickpea

by Zarmeena Khan (2009-VA-514) | Dr. Zubair Farooq | Dr. Naureen Naeem | Dr. Muhammad Nawaz.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2016Dissertation note: Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.), also called garbanzo bean or Bengal gram, belongs to the family Fabaceae of class dicots (Lev-Yadun et al. 2000). It is an important legume crop cultivated over an area of 963.0 hectares with a production of about 675.2 tons in Pakistan. It is the most nutritive pulse extensively used as protein addition to starchy diet. The major issue which influences the chickpea is naturally occurring aflatoxins (AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2) with AFB1 the most important, toxic and carcinogenic. Aflatoxins (AFB1, AFB2, AFG1, and AfG2) are toxins produced by Aspergillus flavis and Aspergillus parasiticus infecting the agricultural crops. Chickpea is largely contaminated by aflatoxins in Pakistan due to seasonal variations, improper management of grains and contaminated soils. These are dangerous fungal metabolites that impair child development, suppress the immune system, cause cancer and in severe acute exposure death occurs, so it is necessary to estimate its toxicity in public health perspective. For this purpose present study was conducted to determine the level of aflatoxins in Chickpea samples (Roasted and Unroasted). Samples were collected from different areas of Lahore i.e. Anarkali, Icchra, Model town, Gulberg, Mughalpura,Iqbal Town, Samnabad, Secretriate, Sabza Zar, Wahdat Road, Shad Bagh, Data Darbar, Thokar Niaz Begh, Cantt, Lohari Gate, Outfall Road, Dharampura, Joray Pull, Rehman Pura, Mozang, Faiz Bagh, Akbari Mandi, Liberty, Jallo Morh, Lahore Medical Society, Darogha Wala, Firdous Market, Siddiqia Colony, District Court, Sanat Nagar and also from chickpea vendors. The samples were analyzed by thin layer chromatography (TLC) to check the presence of aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1 & G2). TLC analyses were further confirmed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to verify the accuracy of TLC. These analyses were performed in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition and WTO labs, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lahore. Experimental results showed that 60 out of 120 samples were contaminated with four different types of aflatoxins. In other words, 50% samples were found contaminated with aflatoxnis. Aflatoxin B1 was the major aflatoxin found in many samples but aflatoxins B2, G1 and G2 were also identified. Samples were analyzed on TLC method and 5% of contaminated samples were re- evaluated on HPLC technique to get precise results. Out of 120 samples sixty samples (50%) were collected from retail shops and other sixty (50%) samples were collected from street vendors. Each category of sixty samples holds 50% roasted and 50% un-roasted samples. Out of 120 total samples of chickpea 60 samples were taken from vendors with 2 categories of roasted and unroasted while 60 samples were collected from shops with the same categories. In those 120 samples, 60 (50%) were contaminated. From those 60 samples 39 (65%) samples were contaminated with aflatoxin B1. And it was also observed that the aflatoxin contamination level in vendors sample was high as compared to samples collected from shops. Out of 39 AFB1 contaminated samples vendor’s samples included 26 (66.66%) samples and samples collected from shops included 13 (33.3%) samples. In 26 vendors’ samples contaminated by AFB1, 18 (69.2%) samples were un-roasted while 8 (30.7%) samples were roasted. Aflatoxin B2 was present in 14 (23.33%) samples from these 60 contaminated samples, and presents only in both vendors and shops samples i.e. 7 (50%) samples from vendors and 7 (50%) from shops. From these AFB2 contaminated samples 10 samples (71.4%) were un-roasted and 4 samples (28.5%) was roasted. Aflatoxin G1 is also present in 5 samples (8.33%), out of which one sample (20%) was collected from vendors and 4 samples (80%) was collected from shop. From these G1 contaminated samples, 1 (20%) was roasted and 4 (80%) was un-roasted. Aflatoxin G2 is present only in two samples collected from vendors and shops, and we can say that 3.33% samples were contaminated with aflatoxin G12, out of 60 contaminated samples. From above results it is concluded that out of 60 contaminated samples 43 (71.66%) were un-roasted and 17 samples (28.33%) were roasted. After the aflatoxin determination in 60 shop’s and 60 vendor’s roasted and unroasted chickpea samples 5 samples were further processed at home by keeping 1 sample unroasted and 4 samples roasted at time intervals of 5mins,10mins,15mins and 20mins in sand bath. All the samples were free from the aflatoxin contamination except one which was unroasted. AFB1 was present in that sample at its minimum level i.e. 32.16µg/kg. AFB1 was present more frequently in chickpea samples. Present study will be supportive for the investigation of aflatoxins in chickpea samples. Chickpea is widely consumed all over the world and occurrence of aflatoxins in this commodity is a major concern to human health. The present situation is too much worse about the levels of aflatoxins which are higher than the prescribed limit by the regulatory authorities. It was observed that TLC technique is good for the determination of aflatoxins in developing countries where the facilities of sensitive instruments are not accessible. Furthermore to quantify levels of aflatoxins by using sensitive instruments like HPLC, GC-MS and LC-MS is required for accurate detection of Aflatoxins (B1, B2, G1 & G2) in chickpea samples available in markets to protect the consumers from exposure of aflatoxins high level which are carcinogenic and hepatotoxic. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2599-T] (1).

146. Handbook of Milk Proeins

by Gardner, Caroline.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: New York: Callisto Reference; 2015Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 636.08522 Gardner 31777 1st 2015 Food.Science] (1).

147. Food Chemistry

by Thapar, Hema.

Edition: 1st ed. Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: India: Pacific Books International; 2010Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 641.3 Thapar 24348 1st 2010 Food.Science] (1).

148. Fundamentals of Nutrition Science

by Sharma, Yogesh.

Edition: 1st ed. Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: New Delhi: Mohit Publications; 2009Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 612.39 Sharma 24590 1st 2009 Food.Science] (1).

149. Nutritional Assessment Of Hypertensive Patients And The Impact Of Nutrition Education On Their Dietary Practices In Contrast To Dash Diet

by Farah Naz (2012-VA-401) | Miss Tahreem Hussain | Dr. Sanaullah Iqbal | Dr. Mamoona Chaudary.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2015Dissertation note: Hypertension is a common public health problem in developing countries. It leads to further complications such as coronary heart disease, stroke and renal disorder. The main reason is unawareness, poor dietary habits and worsened lifestyle in hypertensive patients. Nutritional education at the right time may prevent other risk factors associated with hypertension. Nutrition education have a positive impact on dietary practices of hypertensive patients for secondary prevention. A total of 200 hypertensive patients was purposively selected for this study. The willing patients was informed about the purpose of study and consent was taken. The pretesting of the hypertensive patients was administered about their usual dietary habits through questionnaire, Food Frequency Questionnaire and 24-hour dietary recall. A total of 60 hypertensive patients came with chronic diseases so they were excluded from the Research. Lessons and handouts on nutrition education were given to the patients for a period of four weeks (1 month). After completion of one month of nutrition education, post-testing was administered through filling up of the same Questionnaire, Food Frequency Questionnaire and 24-hour dietary recall to assess the improvement in dietary habits of hypertensive patients and results were calculated. SPSS v. 21 was used for the compilation and analysis. Wilcoxon signed ranked test and Paired t-test was applied to analyze the effectiveness of nutritional education on dietary habits of hypertensive patients. Level of significance was p ≤ 0.05. The present study helped to assess the effectiveness of nutrition education on improving the knowledge and dietary practices of hypertensive patients. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2661-T] (1).

150. Effect Of Various Classroom Educational Activities On Fresh Fruit Intake Of Children

by Anum Zafar (2014-VA-533) | Ms. Tahreem Hussain | Ms. Amina Chughtai | Mr. Muhammad Bilal.

Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2016Dissertation note: Children of age group 3-4 years are developing their dietary habits. Multiple factors affect their eating preferences. Intake of fresh fruits is observed to be less in this age group. Initiative to improve fresh fruit intake during this age is of utmost importance as fruits are rich in micronutrients. The proposed study attempts to find out the effect of class activities on fresh fruit intake of children. The current study hypothesized that class learning activities can improve the consumption of fresh fruits in children and the results of the current study indicates that fresh fruit intake can be increased by different educational activities. A sample of 100 children 3-4 years of age enrolled in The Educators (Shahdara campus) participated in the study. They were divided in four equal sub groups, 25 children in each group. Each group was given the same weighed (109grams) fruit bowls for 20 mins. One group was the control group. In contrast the other three experimental groups received the treatment in the form of different class activities like animated movie, storytelling and the talk session. The fruit bowls were served after these activities and then the weight of the fruit bowls were recorded again. The experiment was performed thrice with a gap of one week to observe the difference. Those participants who were suffering from any type of allergy were excluded from this study. Data of the leftover weight was analyzed statistically by SPSS version 21. Descriptive statistics (frequency/percentage), graphs, tables and graphs were used to analyze the data of different days of the treatment. One way ANOVA was used to check the difference between the outputs of different groups. The result of the current study showed that participant with the treatment of storytelling ate more than any other treatment with lowest mean value of left over weight 14.36, however the group which receive the treatment of discussion had the mean value of 21.49 and the treatment with movie had the mean value of 34.02. Participant belong to the control group did not eat much fruit because they had highest mean value of leftover weight of 39.69. Therefore it can be concluded from the current study that there is a positive effect of different class based learning activities on fresh fruits intake in children of age group 3-4 year. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 2659-T] (1).



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