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1. Food Microbiology

Edition: 5thMaterial type: book Book Publisher: India, McGraw Hill Education pvt Limited New Delhi McGraw Hill Education pvt Limited New Delhi 2013Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.001579 Frazeir 5thed 2013 29943 Food.Science] (1).

2. Food microbiology

by Frazier, W. C | Westhoff, Dennis C.

Edition: 4th ed.Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: India : McGraw Hill; 2012Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 576.163 Frazier 29152 4th 2012 Food.Science ] (1).

3. Food Microbiology

by Adams, Martin R | Moss, Maurice O.

Edition: 3rd ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: UK: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2008Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 637 Adams 3rded. 2008 29374 Microbiology] (1).

4. Food Microbiology : An Introduction

by Montville, Thomas J | Matthews, Karl R | Kniel, Kalmia E.

Edition: 3rd ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: USA: ASM Press, 2012Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.07 Montville 3rded 2012 29287 Microbiology] (1). Checked out (1).

5. Fundamentals of Meal Management

by McWilliams. Margaret.

Material type: book Book Publisher: New Delhi: Dorling Kindersley; 2012Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664 McWilliams 5th 2009 29290 Food Science] (1).

6. Food-Borne Viruses

by Koopmans, Marion P. G | Cliver, Dean O | Bosch, Albert | Doyle, Michael P.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: [S.l.] : ASM Press, 2008Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 615.954 Koopmans Isted 2008 30049 Food.Science] (1).

7. Laboratory Manual: Experimental Foods

by Margaret, McWilliams.

Edition: 8th ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2012Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.3 McWilliams 8th 2012 29609 FoodScience] (1).

8. Biochemical, Physiological and Molecular Aspects of Human Nutrition

by Stipanuk, Martha H | Caudill, Marie A.

Edition: 3rd ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: USA: Saunders, 2013Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 612.39 Stipanuk 3rd 2013 29598 Food.Science] (1).

9. Essential Guide to Food Additives

by Saltmarsh, Mike | Saltmarsh, Mike | Barlow, Sue | Richardson, Vanessa | Robin, Anne-Laure | Jukes, David.

Edition: Fourth EditionMaterial type: book Book Publisher: UK: Royal Society of Chemistry, 2013Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 637 Saltmarsh 4th 2013 29347 Food.Science] (1).

10. Textbook of Human Nutrition

by Agarwal , Anjana | Udipi, Shobha A.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: New Delhi: Jaypee Brothers; 2014Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 613.2 Agarwal 1st 2014 29312 H.Nutrition] (1).

11. Diet, Nutrition and Health

by M., Mittal.

Material type: book Book Publisher: Jaipur: Aadi Publications, 2011Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 613.2 Mittal 29141 1st 2011 Food.Science] (1).

12. Food Science : Experiments & Applications

by Mohini, Sethi.

Edition: 2nd ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: New Delhi: CBS Publisher & Distributors P Ltd, 2013Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664 Sethi 2nd 2013 29288 Food] (1).

13. Understanding Food : Principles and Preparation

by Brown, Amy.

Edition: 4th ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: USA: Wadsworth; 2011Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.1 Brown 4th 2011 29615 Food.Science] (1).

14. Comprehensive Analytical Chemistry

by Barcelo, D | Pic, Yolanda.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: USA : Elsevier Science, 2008Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 637 Barcelo Vol.51 2008 29373 Food.Science] (1).

15. Emerging Technologies for Food Processing

by Sun, Da-Wen.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: Italy:: Academic Press, 2005Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 541.371 Sun 1st 2006 20043 Food.Science] (2).

16. Nutrition in the Prevention and Treatment of Disease / 3rd ed

by Coulston, Ann. M | Ferruzzi, Mario | Coulston, Ann M | Boushey, Carol J.

Edition: 3rd ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: USA: Academic Press; 2013Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 616.0892 Coulston 3rd 2013 29614 Nutrition] (1).

17. Normal and Clinical Nutrition

by Rolfs | Pinna.

Edition: 9th ed.Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: China: WadsWorth; 2012Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 613.2 Rolfs 9th 2012 29306 Nutrition] (1).

18. Novel Food Preservation and Microbial Assessment Techniques

by Boziaris, Loannis S.

Material type: book Book Publisher: Boca Ration: CRC Press; 2014Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664 Boziaris Ist 2014 30100 Food.Science] (1).

19. Probiotic Dairy Products

by Tamimie,Adnan Dr | Tamime.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: USA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2006Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 641.37 Tamime 1st 2005 30212 Dairy] (1).

20. Handbook of Poultry Science and Technology : Primary Processing / Vol.1

by Hui, Y. H | Ph.D, Isabel Guerrero-Legarreta | Ph.D, Alma Delia Alarcn-Rojo | Ph.D, Christine Alvarado | Ph.D, Amarinder S. Bawa | Ph.D, Francisco Guerrero-Avendao | Lundn, Janne | Ph.D, Lisa McKee | PhD, Yoshinori Mine | Ph.D, Casey M. Owens | Regenstein, Joe M | Ph.D, Marcelo R. Rosmini | Ph.D, Jorge Soriano-Santos | Ph.D, J. Eddie Wu.

Edition: Volume 1 Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: USA : Wiley, 2010Availability: Items available for loan: Pattoki Library [Call number: 664.93 Guerrero 29759 1st 2010 Poultry] (1).

21. Foodborne Infections and Intoxications / 3rd ed

by Cliver, Dean O | Potter, Morris | Riemann, Hans P.

Edition: 3rd ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: USA : Academic Press, 2005Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.001579 Riemann 3rd 2006 30179 Food.Science] (1).

22. Food Analysis by HPLC / 3rd ed

by Nollet, Leo M.L | Nollet, Leo M.L | Toldra, Fidel.

Edition: 3rd ed.Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: USA : CRC Press, 2013Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.07 Nollet 30099 3/e 2013 Food.Science] (1).

23. Fundamental Food Microbiology/ 4th ed

by Ray, Bibek | Bhunia, Arun.

Edition: 4th ed.Material type: book Book; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: India : CRC Press, 2007Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.001579 Ray 29109 4th 2008 Food.Science] (2).

24. Food Microbiology

by Narang, S. P.

Material type: book Book Publisher: India : APH Publishing Corporation, 2004Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 664.001579 Narang 30137 1/e 2014 Food.Science] (1).

25. Human Nutrition

by Anderson, John | Root, Martin | Garner, Sanford.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: USA : Jones & Bartlett Learning, 2014Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 613.2 Anderson 30219 1/e 2015 Food.Science] (1).

26. Professional Cooking

by Gisslen, Wayne.

Edition: 4th ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: USA: Wiley, 1999Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 641.57 Gisslen 15796 4th 1999 Food.Science] (1).

27. Perspectives in Nutrition

by WARDLAW, GORDON M.

Edition: 7th International student edition.Material type: book Book Publisher: UK : McGraw Hill Higher Education, 2006Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 613.28 Wardlaw 20071 7th 2007 Food.Science] (2).

28. Carbohydrates

by Johri, Poonam.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: New Delhi: Sonali Publications; 2005Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 547.78 Johri 20822 1st 2005 H.Nutrition] (1).

29. Methods for Protein Analysis : A Practical Guide for Laboratory Protocols

by Copeland, Robert A | Copeland, Robert A.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: USA: Springer, 1994Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 547.75028 Copeland 13593 1st 1994 Food.Science] (1).

30. Biotechnology: A Multi Volume Comprehensive Treatise

by Rehm and G.Reed | Reed, Gerald | Nagodawithana, T. W.

Edition: Volume 9, 2nd ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: [USA] : Wiley-Blackwell, 1995Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 660.6 Rehm 15531 V.9,2nd 1995 Genetics] (1).

31. Applied Mycology and Biotechnology: Agriculture and Food Production / Vol.2

by Khachatourians, George G | Arora, Dilip K.

Edition: 1st ed.Material type: book Book Publisher: Netherlands: Elsevier Science, 2002Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 660.6 Khacha 20117 V.2,1st 2002 Biotecnology] (1).

32. Enzyme and Food Biotechnology

by Ghosh, Bandana.

Material type: book Book Publisher: Delhi: Wisdom Press; 2010Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 574.1926 Ghosh 27081 1st 2011 Genetics] (1).

33. Effect Of Multienzyme Supplementation And Acidification Of Diets On Nutrients Digestibility And Growth Performance Of Broiler

by Abdur Rahman | Dr. Saima | Prof. Dr | Prof. Dr. Talat Naseer Pasha.

Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: drama Publisher: 2012Dissertation note: Major portion of the poultry feed is composed of cereals and vegetable proteins, which cannot be fully digested and utilized by poultry due to lack of endogenous enzymes. However, it can be increased by use of exogenous enzymes. The major cost in the raising of poultry is feed. Utilization of most grains is influenced by the presence of indigestible complex carbohydrates, such as non-starch polysaccharides (NSP's) in poultry. It is possible to partially degrade these NSP's with selective exogenous enzymes acting on specific raw materials, e.g., in spite of having more gross energy in soybean meal than corn, its metabolizeable energy is less than that of corn because of -galactosides (raffinose and stachyose) that can not be digested in small intestine of broilers but these can be hydrolyzed by exogenous enzymes. Addition of organic acids in the feed has shown positive response in growth performance as they are bactericidal and reduce the incidence of Salmonellae in crop and carcass. Furthermore, organic acids are used in feed to get the favorable level of pH for the action of exogenous enzyme -galactosidase .Keeping in view the importance of supplementation of exogenous NSPs enzymes and organic acids, a 35 days trial was conducted in broiler chicks (n=240) by dividing them into eight groups and each group was having three replicates with 10 birds in each. Control group was fed NRC (1994) recommended diet (Diet A). Diet B was formulated with low metabolizeable energy (2630 Kcal/Kg). Diets C, D was formulated by adding two different levels( 0.25 gm/Kg feed and 0.5 gm/Kg feed) of NSP digesting multiezyme "Zympex" in diet B and diets E, F with different levels (0.5% and 1.5%) of citric acid in Diet B. While diets G, H was formulated by adding above mentioned different level of enzyme and citric acid in Diet B. The weekly weight gain results showed that broilers of basal diet attained maximum weight gain which was followed by low energy diet having 500g/ton zympex, low energy diet having 500g/ton zympex plus 1.5% citric acid, low energy diet having 250g/ton zympex plus 0.5% citric acid, low energy diet with 250gm/ton zympex, low energy diet, low energy diet having 250gm/ton zympex plus 0.5% citric acid and low energy diet having 500gm/ton zympex plus 1.5% citric acid respectively. The differences of average weights of various groups when compared statistically with group A, revealed that the weights of group B, C, E, F, G and H were significantly different (p<0.05) whereas, the differences of group A and D were found non significant. While comparison of various groups with B revealed that the weight of group A, D, G and H are significantly different with B, but groups C, E and F are non significant with B. Groups B and C, C and G, B E and F, A and D, G and H are non significant among each other . On comparison of various groups with group D it was found that weights of group B, C, E, F, G and H were significantly different (p<0.05). It is evident from the above results that there is increase in weight of broilers of group D, showing non significant difference from control group A, supplemented with enzyme complex. The results showed that maximum feed consumption was by group B followed by group C, A, D, G, E, H and F. The data of feed consumption when put to analysis of variance showed significant difference (p<0.05) of group A, B, C, D, E and G with F and H while the feed consumption of group F and H was found insignificantly different from each other. When comparison of various groups was made with feed consumption of group A, the feed consumptions of group B, C, D, E, F, G and H were found significantly different(p<0.05). While Comparison of various groups with B showed significant difference in feed consumption with all other groups. The overall FCR of group A was found to be the best among all groups, which was followed by group D, H, G, F, C, E, and B. The analysis of variance among different experimental groups showed a significant difference (p<0.05) when groups B, C, E, F, G and H was compared with A, while D was insignificant with A. While comparing B with all groups showed significant difference with all groups. Group D and H are non significant with each other which indicate that FCR is better in D followed by H among treatment groups which is very near to control group A, showing activity of enzyme complex and acid. The results show the values of glucose level at different time intervals, before feeding the glucose level in groups A, B, C, D, E, F, G and H showed significant results. When the data of glucose was subjected to ANOVA it revealed that group C, D, E, F, G and H were significantly different with A. Group C, D, G and H showed significant difference with B. Group B, E and F were non significant among each other. Group A showed significant different with all groups. The data obtained 1 hour after feeding when subjected to analysis of variance when compared with group A showed that groups B, D, E, F, G and H were significantly different with A. Group A, C, D, F, G and H showed significant difference with B. Group H was significantly higher among all. Data recorded after 2 hour when subjected to ANOVA revealed significant difference of group C, D, G and H with group A and B. Groups A, B, E and F are insignificant among each other. While group is significantly different with all groups. Values of data collected after 3 hours of feeding when subjected to analysis of variance showed significant difference of groups B, C, D, E, G and H with A. Groups A, C, D, G and H were significantly different with B. Group B and F were non significant among each other. Glucose level was higher in H followed by D, G, C, A, F, C and E. The data calculated for ME when subjected to ANOVA it reveals that groups E and F are significantly different with other groups and shows non significant difference among each other. Other groups A, B, C, D, G and H are showing no significant among each other. ME in groups D and G is equal to control group A which shows the action of enzyme or acid which results in more release of energy. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 1440,T] (1).

34. Study On Hepatoprotective Effect Of Camel Milk Against Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced

by Muhammad Aamer Iqbal | Dr. Muhammad Nasir | Dr. Athar | Prof. Dr. Anjum Khalique.

Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: drama Publisher: 2011Dissertation note: Abstract Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 1466,T] (1).

35. In-Vivo Efficacy Study Of Camel Milk In Alloxan Induced Type-1 Diabetic Rabbits

by Hina Ijaz | Dr. Muhammad Nasir | Dr. Ahmad Ali | Prof. Dr. Talat Naseer Pasha.

Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: drama Publisher: 2011Dissertation note: Abstract Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 1473,T] (1).

36. Study On Prevalence Of Osteoprosis And Its Relationship With Dietary And Lifestyle Habits

by Tahir Rasool Qamar | Dr. Muhammad Nasir | Prof. Dr. Makhdoom Abdul Jabbar.

Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2011Dissertation note: Abstract Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 1488,T] (1).

37. Preparation Of Iron Fortified Pasteurized Milk And Its Efficacy Against Iron Defficiency Anaemia In Rats.

by Syed Naveed Akhtar | Dr. Sanaullah Iqbal | Dr. Muhammad Nasir | Prof. Dr.

Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Nature of contents: biography; Literary form: Publisher: 2012Dissertation note: Anemia is abnormal condition in which there is drop in the number of red blood cells or the heamoglobin in them to lower than the normal blood cells and consequently there is less supply of oxygen to body and it gets less energy as compared to it needs for performing normal function (Bunnet al., 1995).The concentration of haemoglobin fluctuates with various factors that involves age, physiological condition, sex and person altitude from sea level below its normal value that is 14g/dL When iron that is absorbed from diet is unable to meet physiological related requirements of the body it leads to nutritional iron deficiency. Locally prepared iron fortified pasteurized milk may be helpful in increasing the haemoglobin status of anaemic patients in the same way as iron supplements. Therefore present project was designed for preparation and characterization of iron fortified milk and its utilization against iron deficiency anemia. In first part of the study Iron fortified milk was prepared by adding different concentrations of iron sulphate (FeSO4) @ 0.00 (as a control), 0.04, 0.06 & 0.08%. In second part sensory evaluation and physicochemical analysis of iron fortified milk samples were performed. During the third part of the study, efficacy of iron fortified pasteurized milk was evaluated in Sprague Dawley Rats.Accordingly the significant outcomes of the present research are summarized hereafter. Proximate analysis showed that the milk prepared from different level of iron are non-significant for fat content as well as for storage intervals (P?0.05) and also the interaction between treatment and storage level also showed non-significant effect. The result for protein of milk fortified by iron at different levels is showed that they are statistically non significant (P?0.05). The storage of these treatments and the interaction between the treatments and storage intervals also showed non-significant effect on protein of different treatments. Analysis of variance for SNF for different treatments of milk shows that they are statistically non significant (P?0.05).Data regarding mean values for storage study of SNF of different treatments showed that the mean values for control milk are 8.21 and there is no increase significantly with iron fortification at 0.04, 0.06 and 0.08% which showed 8.73, 8.66 and 8.82 respectively. As the storage progressed the SNF content not differ significantly from 8.50 to 8.81 at 0 and 4day respectively. The statistical analysis regarding pH for milk fortified by iron at different levels showed that analysis of variance for pH of different treatments of milk, storage shows that they are statistically highly significant (P? 0.01) and the interaction between the treatments and storage intervals showed slightly significant effect on pH of different treatments The statistical analysis pertaining to Total Solids for milk fortified by iron at different levels, storage and the interaction between the treatments and storage intervals also showed that they are statistically non significant (P?0.05). The results for Vitamin C content showed that the values for different treatments for fortification of iron are highly significant (p?0.01).Mean values for storage study of vitamin C different treatments showed that the mean values for control milk are 4.50 and increases significantly with iron fortification at 0.04, 0.06 and 0.08% which is 25.68, 26.01 and 25.26 respectively. As the storage progressed the Vitamin C content decreases significantly from 22.7 to18.5 at 0 and 4day respectively. The interaction between treatment and storage level showed non-significant effect on Vitamin C of iron fortified milk (P?0.05) Using statistical design for mineral Iron of different treatments of milk showed that the fortification of Iron at different levels in milk has significant effect (p?0.001).The results of Mean comparison of Fe showed that control has lowest score (0.06±0.00) and 0.06% and 0.08% had highest scores that is (0.11±0.001) and (0.155±0.001) respectively The statistical analysis pertaining to flavor for milk fortified by iron at different levels , their storage for four days at 4°C and the interaction between the treatments and storage intervals showed that they are statistically non significant (P ?0.05). The statistical analysis pertaining to sensory attributes of iron fortified milk prepared at different levels of FeSO4 and control for taste , colour , flavor, consistency and overall acceptability, their storage for four days at 4°C refrigeration temperature and the interaction between the treatments and storage intervals showed that they are statistically non significant (P?0.05).The statistical analysis pertaining to haemoglobin level w.r.t to groups of rats and study intervals is highly significant (P?0.01) The interaction between different groups and study intervals also showed highly significant (P?0.01) results. For haemotological measurements statistical analysis showed that mean data regarding Group A showed haemoglobin level at 0 day (9.68±0.435)g/dL which increase slightly at 14 and 28 day and then again decrease at 56 day (9.34±0.171) g/dL. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 1494,T] (1).

38. Nutritional Characterization Of Spinach, Fenugreek And Mustard Leaves And Evaluation Of Their Glycemic Index

by Tahira Naz | Dr. Muhammad Nasir | Dr. Ali Raza | Prof. Dr. Talat Naseer Pasha.

Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: 2011Dissertation note: Abstract Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 1512,T] (1).

39. Effecacy Assessment Of Omega-3 Bio-Fortified-Eggs Against Hypercholesterolemia In Human Subjects

by Hussnain Rasul | Dr. Muhammad Nasir | Dr. Athar Mahmud | Dr. Saima.

Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: 2012Dissertation note: Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids which include linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) might reduce risk factors for heart disease through lowering total blood cholesterol, LDL, blood pressure, triglycerides and enhancing the level of blood HDL. Excellent sources of omega-3 fatty acids are fish, flax seed, olive oil etc. Recently the efforts had been successful to bio-fortify or improve the omeg-3 fatty acid contents of the products like eggs through feed manipulation. However, the information was lacking on extent of subsequent health benefits of such bio-fortified/ designer products. For the purpose, this project had been designed to test the efficacy of omega-3 enriched eggs against hyperlipidemia in hypercholesterolemia adult human subjects. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid bio-fortified eggs improved the lipid profile in hypercholesterolemia humans. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids eggs (more than 200mg per egg); already bio-fortified through feeding management, were obtained from University of Sargodha. The eggs were analyzed for chemical composition; protein, carbohydrates, ash, fatty acids, cholesterol content and physical parameters color, weight, volume, density etc. Representative samples from bio-fortified lots and control eggs were boiled and evaluated for organoleptic acceptability through a 10-member panel of trained judges for parameters of taste, texture, flavor and overall acceptability. Finally, representative samples of bio-fortified and control eggs were used for efficacy studies against hypercholesterolemia in human subjects. Twenty- two hypercholesterolemia adult subjects with both sexes without complications were recruited after informed consent, divided into two groups having 11 in each group. We selected those patients whom cholesterol level was > 200mg/dl, triglycerides level also greater than 200 mg/dl, normal blood pressure and no heart problem. First group was provided with bio-fortified eggs whereas second group was not provided either of the eggs. The individuals in 1st group were asked to eat one egg per day in morning until 40 days whereas the individuals in 2nd group were advised to continue with their usual diets. The blood samples of the individuals were obtained at the start of the study, after this blood sample was obtained only weekly basis for 40 days. The blood was analyzed for blood lipid profile to assess the impact of omega-3 bio-fortified eggs against various blood lipid fractions. The data thus collected was analyzed statistically to check significance (Steel et al., 1997). Means were compared for significant difference with t-test for physical and chemical composition parameters and with Least Significant Difference (Duncan, 1955) for efficacy studies. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 1522,T] (1).

40. Characterization And In-Vivo Protein Quality Evaluation Of Various Commonly Consumed Legumes In Pakistan

by Fakhar Gulzar | Dr. Muhammad Nasir | Mr. Tariq | Prof. Dr. Anjum Khalique.

Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: drama Publisher: 2011Dissertation note: Abstract Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 1540,T] (1).

41. Efficacy Assessment Of Ready-To Use-Supplementary-Food For Treatment Of Moderately Acute Malnutrition

by Jalees ul Hassan | Dr. Muhammad Nasir | Dr. Sanaullah Iqbal | Prof. Dr.

Material type: book Book Dissertation note: Abstract Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 1542,T] (1).

42. Preparation Of Low-Glycemic India Vetch-Wheat Composite Flours And Evaluation Of Their Chapatti Making

by Amara Khan | Dr. Muhammad Nasir | Dr. Sanaullah Iqbal | Dr. Sualeha.

Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: drama Publisher: 2012Dissertation note: Wheat is one of the popular cereals that supply the basic nutritional and energy requirements of the population. More so, wheat flour is commonly consumed across the world. Complementation of wheat flour with Indian vetch will not only upgrade its protein quality but also will helpful in decreasing glycemic index because studies have shown effects of Indian vetch on glycemic index. Objectives of the present study are to develop low glycemic, nutritious composite flours and to assess the glycemic efficacy of selected composite flour based chapattisin normal adult human subjects. The present study was conducted in two phases. During first phase composite flours were prepared and their chemical, functional and rheological properties were analyzed. In second phase the effect of sample chapattis on post- prandial glycemic response in healthy subjects was evaluated. The composite flours were prepared by mixing various ratios of wheat flour and Indian vetch flour. The ratio of Indian vetch flour was 10, 20, and 30 g respectively with 90, 80, and 70g wheat flour. Chemical properties revealed that The results for the proximate composition of composite flour and wheat flour show that the moisture content of composite flours is lower than the wheat flour , which progressively decreased as the level of Indian vetch supplementation increased. The supplementation at different levels of Indian vetch flour (seed coat removed during milling) has a significant lowering effect on the crude fiber, ash and crude fat but a significant increase was observed in the protein content, which was due to high protein content of Indian vetch flour. Mean square for bulk density of composite flour blends shows that bulk density was significantly affected by the Indian vetch flour addition (10-30Overall, bulk density ranged from 86.66±1.527 to 83.66±1.154 in all flour blends. Water and oil absorption capacities are amongst the important functional properties for additives supplemented in food systems. Water and oil absorption are significantly affected with addition of Indian vetch). 30% Indian vetch Composite flour showed excellent water holding capacity 5.889±0.040% as compared to wheat flour 4.956±0.056%. The oil absorption capacity of composite flour was noted to be 5.64±0.032% that was significantly higher than that of wheat flour (T0). Therefore water and oil absorption capacities of flour blends were improved at all levels of Indian vetch flour addition. Foaming capacity and stability were also significantly affected among different compositions of flours. T30 flour sample showed foaming capacity 9±0% and foaming stability 8.5±0%, whilst T0 wheat flour possessed 7.166±0.288% and 6.51±0.5% of foaming capacity and stability, respectively. The foaming stability of composite flours increased as the ratio of Indian vetch increased in present study. As expected, Indian vetch flour addition resulted a significant increase in the stability of foam in flour blends. Gelling power of the flour dispersions increased with the level of Indian Vetch flour in flour blends. The highest gelling power was observed in T30 (30% Indian vetch flour). The partial gelation in T20 was observed at 4% flour suspension, whereas in T30 above 3% flour dispersion resulted in complete gelling. The lowest gelling properties were noticed in case of T0 (100% wheat flour). It is evident from results that Indian vetch addition resulted in decreased redness ("a") and increased lightness ("L") . Hunter color values increased significantly with Indian vetch addition in composite flour , representing an increased yellowness of chapatti . The values for Chroma remained same while hue angle also increased momentously by adding up of Indian vetch. Dough rheological behavior is mainly affected due to protein quantity and quality of flour. The rheological characteristics are the source for understanding the dough handling behavior in bakery. Consequently, dough properties play a key role in quality of finished products. Significant variations were observed among various flour samples for these traits. On the basis of sensory evaluation two best chapatti samples T10 and T20 were selected for further efficacy studies. A total of 10 healthy adult volunteers were recruited through flyers, emails and personal contacts. Eligibility for volunteers will be determined on the basis of age (20-50 years), health status, individuals having optimum BMI and free from any communicable diseases and gluten allergy. The study procedure was discussed with all volunteers and were asked to sign the consent to voluntarily participate in the study. Predicted glycemic index was lower in chapattis added with 20% Indian vetch flour than in 10% composite flour and 100% wheat flour. So chapattis of composite flour might be a dietetic alternative forpeople with low-calorie requirements. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 1550,T] (1).

43. Quality Analysis Of Drinking Water Form Various Sources Of Sahiwal City

by Farrukh Ali Ashraf | Dr.Muhammad Nasir | Prof .Dr | Prof. Dr. Talat Naseer Pasha.

Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: drama Publisher: 2011Dissertation note: Abstract Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 1552,T] (1).

44. Effecacy Of Prebiotic Galacto-Olingosaccharides Produced In Low Lactose Skimmed Milk Powder By Transgalactosylation

by Tauseef Ahemd Faiz | Dr. Sanaullah Iqbal | Dr. M. Nasir | Prof. Dr. M. Athar Khan.

Material type: book Book; Format: print Publisher: 2013Dissertation note: Functional food does not only provide nutrition but works as defense against human nutrition related diseases (Menrad et al, 2000). Global market of functional foods industry has worth at least 33 billion US$ (Hilliam, 2000). Functional foods are the foods that provide health gains and can reduce the risk of diseases beside basic nutrition, including health care of gut. The first generation of functional foods involved supplementation of calcium (Ca) and vitamins for their recognized health attributes (Saarela et al, 2002). Among these additives, probiotics and prebiotics have acquired more interest as a major group of functional food additives (Gibson and Ziemer, 1998). GOS present in commercial milk powder has the ability to promote the growth of bifidobacterium and lactobacilli in vitro reported by the studies (Cummings et al, 2001; Cummings, 1995).The market of GOS in infant formulae milk as a food ingredient and due to its bifidogenic properties is gaining popularity (Chow, 2002). GOS are chiefly used in infant milk formula and infant foods (Crittenden and Playne, 2009). Their remarkable thermostable properties allow them to be incorporated in large variety of foods and commercial products in addition to infant foods (Yang and Silva, 1995). Recently, they have been used in beverages (fruit juices and other acid drinks), meal replacers, fermented milks, flavored milks, and confectionery products (Affertsholt-Allen, 2007). Laboratory scale reactions for GOS synthesis were carried out by dissolving 600mM lactose solution in phosphate buffer (0.1 M, pH: 6.8) to which £]-galactosidase at varying levels was added. As indicated by studies in the literature (Kim, 1997; Barbara et al, 2006; Playne et al, 2009), high lactose concentrations facilitate transglycosylation reactions. Milk was procured from local market and concentrated for 15 min and milk was stored at refrigeration temp for further analysis. 5ml of milk samples was taken for enzyme analysis 0£gl, 100£gl, 200£gl, 300£gl and 800£gl respectively samples was collected at 30min _____________________________________________________________SUMMARY 48 and 1hr. Enzyme was denatured by applying heat and samples were analyzed on TLC with lactose and Yakult Oligomate (Oligomate 55N.) as standard. Large scale milk trial was done with respect to our optimization trial is was carried out temprature of 42.5„a C with 2.5hr reaction time. 10litter milk was transgalactosylated and boiling was done at 100„a C to stop further enzyme acticity. Milk was dried through freeze drying technique in PCSIR lahore. Mean values for proximate data of Milk powder is presented in table 4.4 shows Dry matter (96.03¡Ó1.12) while for Fat, Ash and Protein values respectively(18.04¡Ó1.53), (4.02¡Ó0.91) and (31.75¡Ó1.41) respectively. The statistical analysis pertaining to Lactobacilli log10 cfu/g of feces in two groups of mice divided on the basis of prebiotic milk powder incorporation in their diet were highly significant (P <0.01) and also highly significant in study intervals. Similarly bifidobacteria and E.Coli log10 cfu/g in feces of mice were significantly different (P <0.01) in groups and with study interval times. Functional food product milk powder containing transgalactosylated oligosaccharides milk powder can be used at extensive scale for human trials. This could be value added product in which we could produce prebiotic economically. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 1594,T] (1).

45. Nutritional Charactrization Of Common Vetch And Indian Vetch And Evaluation Of Their Glycemic Index

by Saiqa Iqbal Rao | Dr. Muhammad Nasir | Prof. Dr. Makhdoom Abdul Jabbar.

Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2011Dissertation note: Abstract Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 1617,T] (1).

46. Impact Of Dietary Habits, Lifestyle Practices And Preventive Health Care Services On Nutritional Status Of Females of Reproductive Age of Rural Areas in Selected Districts of Punjab

by Rabia Javed | Dr. Muhammad Nasir | Prof. Dr | Prof. Dr. Anjum Khalique.

Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: drama Publisher: 2013Dissertation note: The present study was designed to describe the nutritional status of females of reproductive age years from the rural areas of selected districts of Punjab. For this purpose the data was collected for 300 females from rural areas of Lahore, Kasur and Okara district. A questionnaire was established for collecting the data along with that 24 hours dietary recall and food frequency questionnaire were also been established to assess the nutrition status of females in relation to their dietary habits as well as in relation to their life style. The data was analyzed by cross tabs using SPSS version 20.0. The results of the study showed the significant variations among the districts, age group, marital status,and appetite and food adequacy in relation to their BMI. The impact of socioeconomic status, education level, blood sugar level, menstrual cycle and family setup were insignificant as the p value in all cases was more than 0.05. The females that were receiving adequate food intake were also consuming adequate protein intake. The females of selected age group that were taking adequate food intake were mostly lie in the normal BMI range while that were receiving excessive food intake were mostly overweight as compared to the others that were receiving adequate food intake. Chi square analysis showed the significant difference among the females receiving adequate and inadequate food intake in relation to their BMI as the p value was less than0.05. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 1669,T] (1).

47. In Vitro Comparative Evaluation Of Mutagenicity Of Milk Adulterants Formalin, Hydrogen Peroxide And Melamine Alone and in Combination

by Muhammad Amer | Dr. Muhammad Nasir | Dr. Imran Javed | Dr. Sanaullah Iqbal.

Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2013Dissertation note: Abstract Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 1683,T] (1).

48. The Development Of Tea Whitener By Partial Replacement Of Palm Oil With Canola Oil

by Junaid Kabir | Dr. Muhammad Nasir | Dr. Aftab Ahmad anjum | Dr. Saima.

Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2013Dissertation note: Tea whitener is now become a popular trend in Pakistan with 01 billion tons consumption annually according to my personal information and its consumption is increasing day by day. The replacement of hydrogenated palm oil used traditionally is necessary as they contains 49.3% saturated fatty acids, the majority of which are palmitic acid, myristic acid and lauric acid which are proved to be most injurious for human health, raises the total and LDL cholesterol (Bonanome et. Al, 1998). Canola oil is known for its low level of saturated fatty acids, a relatively high level of monounsaturated fatty acids, and a very good amount of the n-3 fatty acid a-linolenic acid. Canola oil consists of an appreciable amount of a-linolenic acid which amounts for almost 10 percent which is a fairly good quantity. In addition, 1:2 is the ratio balance between linolenicacid and linoleic acid which is favorable and well balanced. Canola oil is a relatively rich source of tocopherols,60-70 mg/100g, contains high level of phytosterols (892 mg/100 g. Keeping in mind the above mentioned nutritional aspects, canola oil based tea whitener is developed. The research was conducted in two phases. During 1stphase the HLB requirement of the canola oil and partially hydrogenated palm oil was determined which are determined as 08 and 06 respectively. Then the emulsifier's percentages are calculated according to their standard HLB values and the doses of the emulsifiers "DATEM" and "GMS" are adjusted according to the ratios of hydrogenated palm oil and canola oil in all the formulations. During second phase the proximate, chemical, physical and sensory analysis are done for all the emulsions so as to determine their resemblance with the control formulation S1. Different graph analysis regarding proximate analysis of canola oil based tea whitener showed that the results for moisture percentage are (85.69 ± 0.089), for crude protein the values are (1.66±0.22), for dry matter its (14.32±0.04) for crude fat the result shows (7.01±0.03). The variation in all the emulsions were negligible, as the ingredients except fat source is almost the same in all the formulations. The results for acidity of tea whitener emulsions on the 2nd day which is 0.09± 0.02 which shows the acceptable range, while on the 6th day the mean value of the acidity is also in the acceptable range which is 0.14± 0.01 which means acidity increases to some extent on the 6th day of storage. The mean of the acidity on the 8th day is 0.16± 0.01. The trend shows the acidity increases from 0.09±0.02 to 0.16±0.01 in 08 days. The variation was observed in all the emulsions with the passage of time, but there is not a very significant difference among all the emulsions as compared to control S1. Mean values for pH on the 2nd day is 6.79±0.03 while the control sample S1 has the pH value of 6.82 on the 2nd day and the treatment which has the lowest pH values on day 2nd is S6 with pH 6.75. The observations on 6th days are shown in pH chart which shows slight decrease in pH in the 6th day with the mean value 6.71±0.02. The mean value of pH on the 8th day is 6.61±0.02. The results showed that pH of tea whitener emulsionsdecreases as storage progressed. A very interesting point raised during study that the pH values of the standard emulsion S1 is higher among all the emulsions on the 2nd day, but as the days proceeds, the pH of the emulsions with different rations of canola oil retains their pH and the pH becomes almost the same as standard on the 8th day. This may concludes that the emulsions containing canola oil retains their ph more as compared to palm oil based emulsion. The mean value of density of the tea whitener emulsions 1.12±0.02. So overall the results variation is not significant. The little difference may be due to the fact that palm oil has density of 0.89 L/kg at 25 C while the density if canola oil is 0.91 L/kg on the same temperature. The density of all the formulations are comparable with the control emulsion S1. The results depicted that 'L" value was decreaseswith increase in the ratio of canola oil. Mean comparison for color "L" parameter showed that highest value for S1 which is 90.45 and least value for S8 which is 89.29. The variation is very slight but the palm oil based emulsions are slight whiter in the appearance.The mean value of a* is -0.285 ± 0.095 which shows a very little variation. The level of greenness decreases slightly as the ratio of the canola oil increases from S1 to S8. The degree of yellowness in the emulsion increases as the ratio of canola oil in increases in the emulsions. The mean value of b* is 2.94±0.27 which shows a slight variation as we go from S1 to S8. The sensory attributes scores obtained from sensory evaluation by trained panelists varies a lot. Addition of canola oil in place of palm oil significantly alters the flavor, After taste and over all acceptability of the tea made with tea whitener emulsions from S1 to S8, the scores are almost the same up to S4 as compared to control formulation S1 for all the attributes mentioned above. Score decreases from S5 to S8 which is definitely due to the addition of canola oil in the formulations. The sensory attributes like fat separation and color get the same scored almost for all the formulations. Flavor scores are almost the same up to S5 but the scores decreases significantly from S6 to S8, for the sensory attribute of "after taste" the formulations from S1 (standard) to S4 get good scores means the after taste if the S2, S3 and S4 are comparable to the control emulsion S1 while S5 to S8 get lower scores, For "overall acceptability" S2, S3 and S4 are nearly equivalent and good scores as compared to control formulation with 100 percent palm oil formulation with the mean value of 90±02 which gives a green signal that we can partially replace hydrogenated palm oil with canola oil. The formulation S5 get a little lower score as compared to control one. The formulations from S6 to S8 get lower scores in overall acceptability. Finally it is concluded that the formulation S4 is the one which can be replaced with the control emulsion S1 for making of tea which means 42.5 percent of the total fat in tea whitener can be replaced successfully with canola oil without compromising the physical, chemical and sensory properties of the tea. Recommendations The main aim of this project was to make a tea whitener which is based on healthier and heart friendly oil (canola oil) instead of palm oil. Canola oil has been used as a cooking oil and also in nutritional products like "Ensure Plus" and "Glucerna" due to its health friendly composition. The idea is drawn from the nutritional products compositions whose fat part is mostly consists of canola oil. In Pakistan, keeping in mind a very huge consumption of tea whitener of 01 billion annually according to my personal information. The production may be much higher as my information may be limited. Keeping in mind the annual production or consumption of liquid tea whitener in Pakistan, the delivery of more healthy oil to the consumers by incorporating it in the liquid tea whitener product seems to be a pretty good idea. It is not only the matter of incorporation of healthy canola oil but also the matter of replacement of saturated fatty acids rich palm oil. Keeping in mind the chemical, physical and sensory properties of tea whitener emulsions S4 with 42 percent canola oil of the oil phase gives similar physical, chemical and sensory properties when compared to control formulation tea whitener S1 with 100 percent palm oil as oil phase. Keeping in mind the composition of the canola oil, if tea whitener is made with 07 percent fat level, in case of S4 (The formulation with resemblance to control up to maximum canola oil extent) canola oil percentage if the total fat is 42.5 percent of the total fat, it will give 0.7 grams of omega-3 as ALA per 250 ml of the tea whitener which means that it will provide 2.8 grams of omega-3 per liter of tea whiteners which can help us to meet up to some extent the ADA recommendations which is 1.3 to 2.9 grams based on 2000 Kcal diet (ADA, 2007) The real challenge in the making of tea whitener formulations with different ratios of canola oil and palm oil is to make a successful emulsions without fat separation, thanks to HLB system for successful making of emulsions. Another challenge is to mask the after taste of the canola oil which can be prominent in the tea whitener, the after taste of canola oil is masked by milk flavor due to which the successful replacement of palm oil with canola oil up to 42 percent becomes possible. The purpose of the product development of making it a source of omega-3 was successfully met as the results shows the partial replacement of palm oil with canola oil is possible. From the present study it can be concluded that canola oil can be incorporated in liquid tea whitener up to the percentage of 42.5 percent of the total fat without any persistent change in chemical, physical and sensory properties of the tea whitener. The concluded value of omega-3 which it gives per 250 ml is 0.7 grams according to fatty acid profile given by ADA reports (ADA, 2007). They do not affect the taste or texture of the product. My study showed that the replacement of palm oil with canola oil up to 42.5 percent in tea whitener formulation was acceptable among consumers and also the tea whitener retained its quality and sensory properties after storage for 08 days at 04 C. The tea prepared from S4 has the same sensory properties as the tea made with the control formulation. It is recommended that canola oil based tea whitener should be a introduced in the market for creating awareness among the general population about the role of omega-3 n human health and threats of consuming saturated fatty acids. There are need of studies forefficacy of developed tea whitener whether it beneficially transmit the omega-3 to human body or not and what are the health benefits among the subjects. More research work is required to testify the product under UHT treatment to find out what are the changes in physical and chemical properties of the product up to 03 months, it's emulsion stability and it's sensory properties during and after 03 months of shelf life in tetra packaging. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 1756,T] (1).

49. Prevalence Of Lactose Intolerance Among The Students Of The University Of Veterinary And Animal Sciences

by Anam Aman | Dr. Sanaullah Iqbal | Dr. Muhammad Nasir | Prof. Dr.

Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: not fiction Publisher: 2013Dissertation note: Lactose is milk sugar. It is found in milk and dairy products. Lactase (Betagalactosidase lactase-phlorizin hydrolase) is the enzyme present in the enterocytes of small intestinal brush border and it is responsible for the breakdown of lactose into its monosaccharide components glucose and galactose that are absorbed into the bloodstream. Lactasedeficiency leads to lactose mal-absorption and resulting gastrointestinal symptoms of intolerance.Lactose intolerance is defined by symptoms of mal-absorption such as abdominal pain,bloating, distention, flatulence and diarrhea due to partial digestion of lactose. This study was conducted in following phases. Lactose intolerance test was performed to diagnose lactose intolerance. In 1st phase lactose solution was prepared by dissolving 25grams of synthetic lactose in 250ml water and in this way 10% lactose solution was prepared and fasting blood glucose level of students was recorded first by using Glucometer. During 2nd phase lactose solution was given to each student and time was noted.During 3rd phase after giving lactose dose blood glucose level of each student was recorded at 30, 60 minutes. Test was consider positive ifafter lactose solution dose the rise in fasting blood glucose level was less than 20mg per deciliter and if rise in fasting blood glucose level was more than 30mg per dl within 1 hour of lactose solution consumption, test was considered negative. If rise in blood glucose level was between 20 and 30mg/dl then on the basis of sign and symptoms of intolerance, it was decided either a person was lactose intolerant or not. According to the criteria mentioned above significant outcomes of the present research are summarized as following: Out of 300(100.0) %, 213(71.0) % had positive lactose intolerance test and 87(29.0) % had negative lactose intolerance test.This study determined that prevalence of lactose intolerance in the UVAS, Lahore students was 71.0%. Correlation of lactose intolerance with gender, age, height, BMI, dietary food preferences was determined using chi square test and Phi Cramer's V, p value was considered significant at p <0.05. Chi square results were significant for age, height and weight. On the basis of finding of this study it can be stated that prevalence of lactose intolerance increases with increase in age, increase in weight and height.Chi square results were insignificant for gender, BMI and dietary food preferences, so prevalence of lactose intolerance is independent entity for gender, BMI and dietary food preferences. Chi square test of independence was calculated comparing the frequency of lactose intolerance for dietary food preferences of subjects. No-significant relationship was found, X2 (2) =3.696, p = 0.158, so p >0.05. There was no correlation between the dietary food preferences of subjects and the lactose intolerance. Phi Cramer's V was used to determine strength of association between lactose intolerance anddietary food preferences of subjects.No significant relationship was found between frequencies of lactose intolerance dietary food preferences.Phi=0-.111, Cramer's V=0.111,p >0.05 There was no difference in results of the dietary food preferences of subjects and the prevalence of lactose intolerance and we can conclude that people who consumed milk products compared to those who did not consume milk/ milk products were equally affected by lactose intolerance as the non-milk product consumers and use of lactose containing milk products does not affect the prevalence of genetically inhered hypolactasia and this is in accordance with Troelsen (2005) findings, Enattah et al. (2002) findings on adult-type hypolactasia and also in accordance with Lisker et al. (1975) and Sahi et al. (1973) findings on recessive inheritance of adult type of intestinal lactase deficiency and recessive inheritance of adult-type lactose malabsorption respectively. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 1780,T] (1).

50. Preparation And Quality Evalution Of Low Fatyoghurt Containing Prebiotic Galacto-Oligosaccharide

by Awais Raza | Dr. Sanaullah Iqbal | Dr. Imran Javed | Dr. Muhammad Nasir.

Material type: book Book; Format: print ; Literary form: drama Publisher: 2013Dissertation note: Prebiotics are considered as selectively cultured food ingredients that impart typical improvements in the activity of the gastrointestinal micro flora that are beneficial to the host well-being and health e.g. Galacto-oligosaccharide (GOS), Fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) and Inulin. These are different types of prebiotics used in food based product. During the last decade consideration for prebiotics in diet is getting popular due to their benefits for human health. The GOS were reported to be beneficial prebiotics for human health. Yoghurt is a fermented milk product, which is produced by the bacterial fermentation of milk. It is a rich source of calcium, protein and vitamin B-complex. Lactose-intolerant people can eat yoghurt without any harm as lactose is converted into lactic acid by the bacterial culture. Yoghurt is more nutritive then milk and possesses better digestibility. The benefit of yoghurt depends upon the presence of beneficial viable bacterial culture in adequate number. The bacterial cultures are used in the fermentation process to metabolize the lactose, secondly the proteolysis of protein for improving bioavailability and thirdly lactic acid bacteria for production of some B-complex vitamins and vitamin K. Yoghurt culture are responsible for the production of aromatic flavor compounds. In Pakistan manufacture of probiotic yoghurt and prebiotic yoghurt is not common and there is not consumer awareness for such kind of products. Therefore, this study was designed to develop prebiotic yoghurt from prebiotic milk and compare it with control yoghurt. First of all milk was pastuerised and then cool to 45°C. After that ?-galactosidase was added. Transgalactosylation was carried out at 45oC with 3 hr reaction time. Enzyme was denatured by applying heat and starter culture was inoculatedand 4-5 hours were given for fermentation. During storage the prepared control and prebiotic yoghurt was evaluated for its physiochemical analysis and sensory qualities. Mean values of fresh yoghurt and prebiotic yoghurt are presented in tables 4.4 to 4.8 show that lactose (1.44±0.03) while for fat, protein, pH and acidity (3.43±0.15), (4.2±0.1), (4.47±0.05) and (0.92±0.01) respectively. A panel of 10 judges evaluated the yoghurt samples for appearance, taste, color and overall acceptability on 15cm unstructured lines (15 = like extremely; 1 = dislike extremely). The sensory evaluation of the product at 0, 7, 14, 21 and 28 day was carried out in the Department of Food Science & Human Nutrition, University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Lahore. Fat, pH and ash contents were continuous decreased while protein, total solid and acidity values show continuous increase in of all treatments. All the results obtained were analyzed through Analysis of Variance Technique (ANOVA) by using Costat software. Prebiotic milk and prebiotic yoghurt can be prepared on industrial scale because it is highly acceptable. This could be a value added product in which we can produce prebiotic economically. Availability: Items available for loan: UVAS Library [Call number: 1790,T] (1).



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